Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

January 21, 2015
Going to college exclusively full time isn't the best way for adult students who are returning to college to earn an associate degree, new data show.
January 19, 2015
A group of 24 colleges and universities have teamed up to develop and share online courses that are designed to help students complete general-science education courses. Arizona State University and Smart Sparrow, an "adaptive" learning company, helped create the group, which is dubbed the Inspark Science Network.
January 19, 2015
City College of San Francisco's supporters notch an incremental court victory in their feud with the college's accreditor. But the accreditor still gets to make the final call, judge rules.
January 16, 2015
A California judge's "tentative" ruling on Friday said City College of San Francisco did not receive a fair hearing from its accreditor, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, according to KQED News. A final decision is still pending in the lawsuit, which San Francisco's city attorney filed in a local court. The suit seeks to block the comission's decision 16 months ago to revoke City College's accreditation.
January 16, 2015
The Atlantic has issued a more than 300-word correction to an article on admissions to four-year institutions in the City University of New York (CUNY). The piece, which the magazine published earlier this week, asserts that five of the system's colleges have gotten more selective during the last 15 years, and now admit fewer freshmen from New York City than was previously the case.
January 15, 2015
City College of San Francisco's regional accreditor has granted the college a two-year restoration of its accreditation status. The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) in 2013 moved to revoke the community college's accreditation, citing financial mismanagement and a wide range of other problems. That would have been a death blow to the huge institution, which would have lost eligibility for federal and state student aid programs.
January 15, 2015
Seton Hall University and the Hackensack University Health Network on Wednesday announced a plan to create a new school of medicine. The four-year school will be located on the campus of a former biomedical facility in Nutley and Clifton, New Jersey. The private university and the New Jersey-based health company said the school would be combined with Seton Hall's existing nursing and allied health programs. Hackensack's hospitals also will serve as Seton Hall's primary clinical teaching sites.
January 14, 2015
Study says Washington State's performance funding formula has not improved completion rates at two-year colleges, but officials at the system point to data that say otherwise.
January 13, 2015
The proposed sale of 56 campuses of the for-profit Corinthian Colleges chain to ECMC, a student loan guarantor, has been postponed until next month, Corinthian said in a corporate filing. The deal, which the U.S. Department of Education brokered, had been scheduled to close in January.
January 13, 2015
The Education Department will loosen financial-aid rules for 40-plus colleges as they experiment with competency-based education and prior learning assessment.

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