Paul Fain

Paul Fain, Senior Reporter, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

April 11, 2014
Josh Wyner's new book describes what community colleges do well, and what they can do better.
April 10, 2014
The academic preparation of incoming colleges students has a strong impact on dropout rates, according to a newly released report from the ACT, which is a nonprofit testing organization. The findings show that students have the greatest risk of dropping out if they earn lower scores on college readiness assessments, particularly students with less-educated parents.
April 10, 2014
The Los Angeles area has California's most pressing unmet need for community college slots, according to a new analysis released by California Competes, a nonprofit group. Much of the lagging capacity at two-year institutions around the state has been hard to track.
April 8, 2014
A newly formed coalition of 20 states is trying to create joint data standards and data sharing agreements for non-degree credentials, like industry certifications. While demand is high for these credentials, data is scarce on whether students are able to meet industry-specified competencies. The Workforce Credentials Coalition, which held its first meeting at the New America Foundation on Monday, wants to change that by developing a unified data framework between colleges and employers.
April 7, 2014
The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) on Sunday released a report of suggestions for how two-year institutions can improve completion rates, better work with employers and be more accountable. The guide is linked to a 2012 report from the association that called for substantial changes in how the sector operates. Over the weekend the association kicked off its annual meeting in Washington, D.C., which continues until Tuesday.
April 7, 2014
New report sheds light on the oft-ignored adjunctification of community colleges, which may be a barrier to college completion.
April 3, 2014
The U.S. Senate's Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) on Wednesday announced that it had approved Portia Wu as assistant secretary of labor for employment and training. Wu is a lawyer who previously worked for the committee.
April 2, 2014
Congress expanded federal student loan default metrics to scrutinize for-profits, but community colleges are worried, too, at least one with good reason.
April 2, 2014
Timothy P. Slottow is the next president of the University of Phoenix, the large for-profit institution announced on Tuesday. Slottow is currently executive vice president and chief financial officer for the University of Michigan. Phoenix has hired a leader from traditional higher education in the past.
April 2, 2014
The labor market returns for associate degrees remained strong throughout the recession, according to newly released research from the Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment (CAPSEE). Students who earned a two-year degree, or who transferred and completed a bachelor's degree, earned more and were less likely to be unemployed than were their peers who failed to graduate or transfer, according to the research.

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