Paul Temple

Paul Temple is reader in higher education management at the Institute of Education, University of London, where he co-directs the Institute’s Centre for Higher Education Studies. He is also co-director of the Institute’s M.B.A. in higher education management. He has worked internationally as a consultant on higher education planning and management issues, and was previously head of the University of London’s Planning Division. His current research interests are in the university’s role in the knowledge economy and in the effects of the physical form of the university on institutional effectiveness. He is executive editor of the London Review of Education.

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Most Recent Articles

April 29, 2012
Government policies from the late 1990s have stimulated competition between existing universities in England and lowered the barriers to entry for new providers. This process has been accelerated under the coalition government which took office in 2010 — its 2011 White Paper sets out a number of measures intended, apparently, to encourage greater private sector involvement in English higher education – for example, by making it easier to gain a university title, and to remove legal impediments to private companies buying existing universities.
June 21, 2011
A hot new topic for gossip in British university common rooms emerged over the weekend of 4/5 June with news of the launch of the “New College of the Humanities” (www.nchum.org), to be located in Bloomsbury, the home of many of the institutions that comprise the University of London.
January 23, 2011
  Higher education in England is currently the subject of an extraordinary experiment in the allocation of public funding: the question is, will the patient survive, and if so, in what state?
October 30, 2010
English (rather than British) higher education is presently digesting the report by Lord Browne, the ex-boss of BP, called Securing a Sustainable Future for Higher Education, published on 12 October. Browne’s report provided the context for the higher education component of the government’s Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR) announced on 20 October, which reduced the state budget for higher education by 40%, to be achieved in the period to 2014/15. This is, quite literally, an unprecedented cut in public support for higher education.
September 20, 2010
In 2006, a new way of charging university students for tuition was introduced in England (Scotland did something different). Universities were allowed to charge undergraduates fees up to £3000 a year (since uprated to about £3300), a significant increase on the previous level, but now the government would pay the fee to the university on the student's behalf, recovering it from the student through the tax system once she or he was earning a sum somewhat below the national median income.
August 16, 2010
Brian Flowers, 1924-2010 I've just said by last farewell to a former boss while welcoming a new one.
July 20, 2010
Two recent speeches by Ministers in the UK’s new (since May) coalition government have set out the government’s stall on higher education. The Minister for Universities and Science, David Willetts (a Conservative), gave a speech on 10 June, and his boss, the Secretary of State, Vincent Cable (a Liberal Democrat) gave one on 15 July.
June 30, 2010
The new UK coalition government presented its “emergency budget” to Parliament on 22 June. This aims to more or less eliminate the current deficit, mostly created in order to bail-out overstretched banks in 2008, by taking £113 bn (say US$ 170 bn) out of the economy in spending cuts and tax increases by 2014/15.
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