Rosemarie Emanuele

"Math Geek Mom"

Although she holds a Ph.D. in economics from Boston College, Rosemarie Emanuele is a professor and the chair of the Department of Mathematics at Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, Ohio, just outside of Cleveland. She loves to teach math but also pursues research related to the economics of nonprofit organizations and volunteer labor, and has published in both economics and interdisciplinary journals — as well as in the book that inspired this blog. She is the proud mother of a wonderful daughter.

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Most Recent Articles

May 19, 2011
The phrase "one-to-one correspondence" is sometimes used in mathematics. This describes, for example, how numbers, often learned as abstract sounds in early childhood, can be, one by one, matched with objects. As parents may realize, this is how we teach a child how to count. One-to-one correspondence also shows up in other places in math, as, for example, when rational numbers may be put into one-to one correspondence with the integers, thus showing that there are a countable number of rational numbers.
May 12, 2011
An article in last week’s Inside Higher Ed discussed the option of teaching at a religiously affiliated college. It caught my attention since I am in my 42nd year of religiously-affiliated education. I went to Catholic grammar school, Catholic high school and college and then even earned my Ph.D. at a Catholic University.
May 5, 2011
OK, so Donald Trump found me out. His recent statement that "most economists aren’t very smart" made me realize that my act wasn’t fooling him, after all. Of course, he has no idea of who I am, but the fact that he pronounced to the world that people with my degree are not very smart well, it just smarts. Ouch. So he knows that I am just skating by, hoping to survive day to day, knowing that my past success is all a fluke and that I don’t have any real talent, after all? How did this person I have never met figure that out?
April 28, 2011
In statistics we often talk about an idea of the “expected value.” By multiplying outcomes of something that involves uncertainty by the probability of each outcome occurring, we are able to find a value that is a good representation of the outcome that would most likely occur. For example, in a lottery, a large payoff is often offset by the huge number of people who buy a ticket just that once, in hopes of cashing in on the large payoff. This leads the expected value of a person’s winnings to possibly be less than the price of a ticket to even enter the lottery.
April 14, 2011
I chose my first job out of graduate school for several reasons. The president of that university was a graduate of my graduate program, had been working in some very unusual areas, and wanted me and my research as part of where he saw the university going at the time (he died a few years later, but I believe that much of his vision did eventually come to be, if only, sadly, without me.) I had come to maturity with the Jesuits, and therefore wanted to teach with them, and the position was in a Jesuit university.
April 7, 2011
I ran into the chair of the Sociology department the other day as I came out of my Calculus class. He stopped me to ask me about a question that had come up in discussion in his class. He wanted to know why it seemed that women were still avoiding majors that were focused on math and the sciences, since he and his students, like one of the responders to my column a few weeks ago, realized that high pay is strongly correlated with the amount of math and science education one acquires in their educational journey.
March 31, 2011
Economics teaches us that we make choices based on the constraints we face. Often, these are based on the limits of the income we have at our disposal. I was reminded of this concept as I recalled my graduate school days of living in Boston.
March 24, 2011
The calendar says that last weekend was the official start of spring, but those of us who live in what is often called the “snow belt” of Ohio know that we can’t trust that the end of winter has arrived. However, last weekend offered us a glimpse of what we hope lies ahead in the next few months.
March 17, 2011
I usually enjoy reading comments to my columns, and my column from last week was no exception. I picked up several comments to the list of reasons I spelled out that are commonly given for why women are paid less than men. One of the reasons I gave was the argument commonly made that women may get paid less than men because they tend to have less education than men of similar background. This argument was only one reason in the list I gave, but was the one argument that drew comments.
March 10, 2011
I am commonly struck with a mixture of pride, relief and fear when I hand in my column each week. The fear comes from a realization that I need to write another column next week. This was not the case for long last week. After reading the comments posted to my column from last week, I realized that I wanted to dust off some of my text books from my Labor Economics classes I taught long ago. In them are some thoughts about why it is that women are often paid less than men, a common theme among the respondents to my column last week.

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