Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

April 6, 2010
Applications from outside the United States are up 7 percent in 2010 at American graduate schools, a healthy increase that will please many universities, according to a new survey released by the Council of Graduate Schools.
April 6, 2010
Tarleton State University last month called off a production of Corpus Christi -- a controversial play in which a Jesus-like character is depicted as gay, and endorses gay marriage -- following a barrage of criticism from religious groups and threats against the production and the university. Some of those opposed to the play vowed to go after any other college production of the play.
April 6, 2010
In the past year, many faculty members and students who never paid much attention to the concept of "endowment payout rates" and their rolling averages have had reason to learn about them. In short, the idea is that colleges and universities shouldn't decide each year what share of their endowments to spend, but should have a standing philosophy on the appropriate payout rate, and should average that rate out over several years to avoid spending too much or too little based on a particularly good or bad financial year.
April 6, 2010
Haki Madhubuti is by all accounts a key player in modern black literature -- a poet, novelist and essayist whose own works are part of the canon of African American studies. As the founder, in 1967, of the Third World Press, he was publishing people like Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka and Mari Evans in an era when establishment publishers were rarely open to such voices.
April 5, 2010
Theories abound about why academics are more liberal than are average citizens. Some blame bias, arguing that conservative scholars are denied positions. Others see self-selection at work, with academe attracting more liberal individuals, while conservatives are more likely to opt for other careers. Still others see some sort of socialization going on in graduate programs or early faculty careers, such that the young academic emerges on the left. And there are numerous other theories.
April 5, 2010
American academic leaders are casting a wary eye on developments in higher education in the rest of the world. Will the Bologna Process give Europe an edge? Will the development of research universities in countries outside the West stop the best talent from coming to the United States? What does it mean when American colleges and universities open up campuses thousands of miles away from their home base?
April 2, 2010
For-profit higher education has had no difficulty attracting black students. When the University of Phoenix announced its growth to 443,000 students in the fall, it noted that 27.7 percent of its new students are African-American.
April 1, 2010
The Obama administration has filed a brief with a federal appeals court offering strong backing to the University of Texas at Austin over its consideration of race and ethnicity in admissions decisions.
April 1, 2010
During the last year, many college presidents -- frequently as a prelude to employee salary freezes (or cuts) -- announced that they were freezing or cutting their own salaries. While such announcements became common, it turns out that a notable minority of private college presidents did receive raises, some of them healthy ones for a year of little inflation.

Pages

Back to Top