Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 30, 2009
Students and faculty members both think colleges have a key role to play, but don't necessarily think that role is being fulfilled.
September 29, 2009
University says it acted out of concern that his talk on Islam would attack that faith.
September 29, 2009
With the growth of virtual high schools, new issue surfaces for admissions officers.
September 28, 2009
BALTIMORE -- Carleton College has 18 new students from China this year, and they are paying about half of their own expenses. A handful of them don't need any financial aid at all. While Chinese graduate students are no shock on university campuses, significant cohorts of undergraduate applications from China are a new phenomenon at most colleges. Just a few years ago, Carleton had only three or four students enrolling from China, and it never enrolled students who could afford to pay their own way.
September 28, 2009
Admissions group continues to draw attention to concerns about standardized testing, and the success of colleges that have moved away from relying on it.
September 25, 2009
A variety of strategies -- some of which would be expensive to continue -- got institutions through the last, economically messy year, survey finds.
September 25, 2009
New battle emerges over online tools to let students apply with ease to many institutions. Is the Common Application about to face an entirely different form of competition?
September 22, 2009
When in doubt, sue. That philosophy has become an expected part of American society and (to the frustration of many in higher education) academe as well. A new book -- The Trials of Academe: The New Era of Campus Litigation (Harvard University Press) -- combines humor and history to examine the impact (most of it negative) of academic disputes landing in court. Amy Gajda, the author, is assistant professor of journalism and law at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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