Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

June 23, 2010
It wasn't that hard for admissions officers for the M.B.A. program at Pennsylvania State University to figure out that they had a plagiarism problem this year. One of the topics for application essays referenced the business school's idea of "principled leadership." Some applicants apparently Googled the term and came up with an article about the concept in a publication of a business school association. Thirty applicants submitted essays that either lifted many passages straight from the article or substantially paraphrased the article without appropriate attribution.
June 22, 2010
Three national groups of historians -- the American Historical Association, the National Council on Public History and the Organization of American Historians -- have now all endorsed guidelines that suggest a new, broader approach to tenure when considering public historians.
June 21, 2010
The announcement last year that Brandeis University planned to sell its noted, 6,000-piece collection of modern art stunned and angered museum officials around the world. The university said it needed money for its other operations. But to the art world, the plan represented a rejection of the idea that nonprofit institutions do not sell art from their museums except as a means to expand their collections.
June 21, 2010
Freshmen who have many of their courses taught by adjuncts are less likely than other students to return as sophomores, according to a new study looking at six four-year colleges and universities in a state system. Further, the nature of the impact of adjunct instruction varies by institution type and the type of adjunct used, the study finds.
June 21, 2010
A new study may revive arguments that the average test scores of black students trail those of white students not just because of economic disadvantages, but because some parts of the test result in differential scores by race for students of equal academic prowess. The finding -- already being questioned by the College Board -- could be extremely significant as many colleges that continue to rely on the SAT may be less comfortable doing so amid allegations that it is biased against black test-takers.
June 18, 2010
Criminology and criminal justice are hot. Even in these financially constrained times, colleges can't seem to get enough of these programs. Arizona State University last month announced a new online bachelor of science degree in criminology and criminal justice. Nyack College is starting a bachelor's degree. So is Rockhurst University, with a commitment to placing students in internships. Rochester Institute of Technology recently started a master's program. Texas State University is starting a doctorate. The list could go on and on.
June 17, 2010
East-West University says that its announcements this month about adjunct hiring have nothing to do with the union drive going on. It's all just a coincidence. Union leaders are dubious.
June 16, 2010
The following individuals have recently been awarded tenure by their colleges and universities: Austin College --Brett Boessen, communication studies--Kirk Everist, communication studies--David Griffith, business administration--Andra Troncalli, physics Pomona College --Robert Gaines, geology--Arthur Horowitz, theater and dance--Eric Hurley, psychology and Africana studies--Nina Karnovsky, biology--Peter Kung, philosophy--Sarah Raff, English--Ghassan Sarkis, mathematics
June 15, 2010
WASHINGTON -- The United States economy is in serious danger from a growing mismatch between the skills that will be needed for jobs being created and the educational backgrounds (or lack thereof) of would-be workers. That is the conclusion of a mammoth analysis of jobs data being released today by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

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