Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

January 30, 2009
The most logical reason to focus on "time to degree" for doctoral students is that most of them say they want to finish -- and most graduate departments say the same thing. People are happier and programs are more efficient.
January 29, 2009
Archaeologists nationwide protest Penn's move to eliminate jobs of 18 scholars, none of them with tenure but many with lengthy careers. University sees need for focus and fund raising.
January 28, 2009
Obama designates as NLRB chair a member who backs collective bargaining at private universities -- and that could be key step in reviving campaigns that have been stagnant since 2004.
January 27, 2009
University hopes noted 6,000 piece collection will bolster finances, but move violates museum standards. Institution also considers "meta-majors" and adding business programs.
January 27, 2009
Professors in Seattle find success in teaching information literacy and basic research skills -- as a means to engage students in a discipline many of them are disinclined to like.
January 26, 2009
SEATTLE -- Community college students are no more likely to transfer to four-year institutions in states where there are articulation agreements designed to ease such transfers than they are in states without them, according to a new study. But having more tenured faculty members at community colleges does make a difference.

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