Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

August 18, 2008
National study suggests large population of students who consider taking their own lives -- and never seek counseling.
August 18, 2008
Growing discount rate and rising costs create financial crunch -- and worries -- at a private university.
August 18, 2008
Colorado group challenges Ward Connerly's latest referendum by trying to put its own anti-quota measure on the fall ballot -- in a way that would preserve current diversity programs.
August 15, 2008
Experts say Iowa president's move to require programs for all faculty and staff is an appropriate and strong response against harassment. Others see collective punishment.
August 14, 2008
Court's rejection of Christian schools' suit against U. of California points to tensions facing admissions officers that go beyond the case's curricular dispute.
August 13, 2008
Test continues to experience rapid growth, which may explain small drop in average score. Popularity continues to rise in states dominated by SAT.

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