Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

July 22, 2008
Book's revelations about CIA's use of Penn professor's work intensify debate over how social scientists should help (and not help) interrogations.
July 21, 2008
U. of San Diego announced that Rosemary Ruether would be teaching about Catholicism there in 1-year position; then critics of her views mobilized.
July 21, 2008
The following individuals have recently been awarded tenure by their colleges: Ohio University -- Main Campus
July 18, 2008
A new book -- The Myth of the Model Minority: Asian Americans Facing Racism (Paradigm Publishers) -- challenges the idea that most Asian Americans are relatively untouched by racism or focused on issues related to equity. Based on field interviews nationwide, the book describes the Asian American experience in schools, colleges, the workplace and public discourse.
July 17, 2008
Research released in new book argues that a set of nuanced issues -- such as assignments that take female professors away from scholarly inquiry -- limit their advancement.

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