Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

August 28, 2007
American universities report increases in applications and admission offers, but numbers still haven't reached 2003 levels.
August 28, 2007
Board -- after insisting that suspending the college was only option -- agrees to consider alumni plan to keep it operating; decision expected in October.
August 27, 2007
DePaul calls off Norman Finkelstein's classes and takes away his office. He vows to show up and teach -- and to use civil disobedience if necessary.
August 27, 2007
The 4,400 people whose scores were in error will be entitled to at least $275 each.
August 27, 2007
Study finds more colleges -- especially in Northeast -- are amending anti-bias policies and adding options for housing and bathrooms.
August 27, 2007
Rutgers agreement with faculty union pledges to create at least 100 new permanent faculty jobs over next 4 years.
August 24, 2007
Lots of colleges talk about preparing students for civic and social contributions. New study explores why students only get the message at some institutions.

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