Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

August 17, 2007
U.S. News sees drop in college presidents willing to judge other institutions' reputations; Pell Grant population used for first time, but with minimal impact.
August 16, 2007
Just weeks after Cambridge settlement that dismayed scholars, Yale prevails in ending libel suit over book it published about Hamas.
August 16, 2007
Critics of decision to suspend college operations create online archive of confidential documents from the administration.
August 15, 2007
Social scientists are more worried now than during McCarthy era, survey finds. Sociologists consider why and what to do about it.
August 15, 2007
A growing movement within the discipline raises questions about promotion, peer review, the nature of research and the future of the field.
August 14, 2007
Sociologists -- especially those who study sexuality -- have for years done research that was considered controversial or troublesome by politicians or deans. Many scholars are proud of following their research ideas where they lead -- whatever others may think. But at a session Monday at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, sociologists considered the possibility that some of their colleagues may feel enough heat right now that they are avoiding certain topics or are being forced to compromise on either the language or substance of their research.
August 13, 2007
Amid legal and political defeats for affirmative action, sociologists present new research to illustrate the continuing impact of racial inequities.

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