Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

April 8, 2008
While educators see the value in low fees, they get challenged by a trustee who thinks it's fine for students to pay.
April 8, 2008
Lawsuit against U. of Texas raises novel question: If a university has diversity success with a "percent plan," does that preclude doing more?
April 7, 2008
While Blackboard dominates course-management market at 2-year colleges, more institutions are looking elsewhere.
April 7, 2008
To many writing instructors, going nuclear (expulsion threats) or high tech (detection software) have failed to stop cheating. So they aim for small victories, through new approaches to teaching about academic integrity.
April 4, 2008
Data show stability in number of programs and enrollments, but continued shifts in what programs are called, reflecting tensions within the field over its role and whether it is a single field.
April 3, 2008
The fire and brimstone approach to preventing plagiarism has failed to promote either understanding of ideas of academic integrity or its practice, according to many essays in a new collection, Originality, Imitation, and Plagiarism: Teaching Writing in the Digital Age. The book, just published by the University of Michigan Press, features essays on how these issues play out in different disciplines and a mix of philosophical and practical approaches to an

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