Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

February 13, 2008
New study suggests counseling philosophies make a difference for those considering 4-year institutions, but not for 2-year institutions.
February 12, 2008
Despite reports of "digital divide," some colleges report notable progress in attracting minority students through online programs.
February 11, 2008
As hundreds of presidents gather for American Council on Education meeting, one of their own delivers sharp critique of the way higher ed treats the 2-year sector.
February 8, 2008
In campus health centers, Heather Munro Prescott sees much more than places to promote student health. Their history reflects important societal values on the evolution of higher education in the United States, about the education of women, and about some of the most controversial social issues of the day.
February 7, 2008
Report examines demographics of those holding jobs that frequently lead to chief positions on campuses, and finds more women, but a largely white pool.

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