Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

December 11, 2007
Harvard University on Monday unveiled a new approach to financial aid and a new definition of "middle income." The result will be substantially more generous aid packages for Harvard students with families that have incomes up to $180,000, who will be assured that family contributions to students' costs will not exceed 10 percent of family income in a given year. Harvard is also eliminating all loans from aid packages and eliminating home equity in calculations of family wealth.
December 10, 2007
As opponents of scientific consensus make free expression claims, a professor who wrote book to reconcile faith with evolution is banned from teaching general biology or having his book taught.
December 7, 2007
New data suggest that more people who start doctoral programs are sticking with them, at least in the sciences.
December 7, 2007
One study finds Western universities rushing in without a plan. Another study questions institutes being created by Chinese government at universities worldwide.
December 6, 2007
6 departments have now distanced themselves from their professional association's stance on interrogations, which they consider ethically inadequate.

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