Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

October 30, 2007
Colleges experiment with effort to better measure the economic needs of foreign undergraduates.
October 29, 2007
Antioch board delays decision; leaders from other colleges consider how nontraditional programs can thrive.
October 29, 2007
With legislation blocked in Congress and vetoed in California, educators worried about undocumented students consider the consequences.
October 29, 2007
AFT statement aims to reflect – and to promote strategies for fighting – challenges of faculty life today, especially off the tenure track.
October 29, 2007
At Michigan State, British politician with history of Holocaust denial and racially inflammatory views sets off controversy.
October 26, 2007
Keeping forms short is the rage, but does this help wealthy get aid they don't need? At College Board meeting, officials are split -- amid some talk of board getting back in federal aid application business.

Pages

Back to Top