Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

October 5, 2007
While most programs are new, evidence emerges that they are having success with the disadvantaged students who frequently are lost to higher ed.
October 4, 2007
U. of St. Thomas decides that the Nobel laureate’s past comments on Israel were “hurtful” to some Jews and so blocks invitation he had accepted to speak on campus.
October 2, 2007
In 1990, Ernest Boyer published Scholarship Reconsidered, in which he argued for abandoning the traditional “teaching vs. research” model on prioritizing faculty time, and urged colleges to adopt a much broader definition of scholarship to replace the traditional research model.
October 1, 2007
Faculty group largely ignored resolutions against their proposal to isolate Israeli academics, but backs down when its lawyer says the action could be illegal.
October 1, 2007
While admissions officers and high school counselors don't necessarily agree on all the ways to deal with "admissions creep," the issue has captured their attention.

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