Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 4, 2007
Steve Lawry is out of his job and barred from campus, leaving many alumni and professors again doubting sincerity of university's board and chancellor.
September 4, 2007
Texas Supreme Court throws out state regulation of some religious institutions -- and some fear diploma mills will gain a new way to evade scrutiny.
August 31, 2007
Political scientists consider how they can shake up their teaching techniques, and report success with some unconventional approaches.
August 30, 2007
Specific curricular approaches can move students beyond apathy and ignorance -- without necessarily changing their ideologies, new Carnegie study finds.
August 30, 2007
Counselors voted last year to bar making offers before September 15 of senior year of high school; some universities now seek a new vote.
August 30, 2007
At the beginning of their new book on for-profit higher education, William G. Tierney and Guilbert C. Hentschke talk about the academic division between "lumpers" and "splitters," the former focused on examining different entities or phenomena as variations on a theme and the latter focused on classifying entities or phenomena as truly distinct.

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