Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 10, 2007
Presidents of top liberal arts colleges criticize ratings but refrain from joint pledge others made to stop filling out "reputational" survey.
September 10, 2007
Essay prompts debate over paucity of women in top departments and in the pages of top journals.
September 7, 2007
The New York Times on Thursday announced a major push into higher education -- with new efforts to provide distance education, course content and social networking. A number of colleges are already either committed to using the new technologies or are in negotiations to start doing so, evidence of the strong power of the Times brand in academe.
September 7, 2007
What are the roles of race, money and athletic talent? How is merit defined? A sociologist spent 18 months in an admissions office, and shares the tensions and idealism he found.
September 6, 2007
Controversial professor resigns and both sides issue conciliatory statements, but many believe academic freedom issues will outlast tenure dispute.
September 6, 2007
Professors and students at Manhattanville are demanding to know why a popular administrator worked there one day and was gone the next.

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