Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 29, 2006
In strategy shift, advocates plan new litigation to force federal officials to challenge state policies on programs and funding.
September 28, 2006
After the anti-sweatshop movement grew on campuses a decade ago, a framework arose for resolving protests and making it possible for colleges to continue to enjoy revenue from licensing their logos for use on clothing and other products.
September 27, 2006
Experience of past blue ribbon panels suggests reasons why Spellings panel may or may not have lasting impact.
September 26, 2006
Computer science -- like many dot.com businesses of a few years back -- has experienced a boom and bust in the last decade. First colleges couldn't expand programs fast enough to meet demand, but more recently students have been fleeing. The number of students taking Advanced Placement tests in computer science fell by 19 percent in the last three years -- even as other AP science programs were growing.
September 26, 2006
Female professors are less likely than men to feel they know what is expected of them to earn tenure, study finds.

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