Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

February 12, 2007
The night before Drew Gilpin Faust was formally named president of Harvard University, women involved in efforts to promote female leaders in academe happened to be gathering in Washington for workshops and networking sessions hel
February 9, 2007
William & Mary board says president made mistakes but declines to reverse him, opting to await report of new committee.
February 8, 2007
Chicago announces expanded benefits for students in humanities and social sciences -- with goal of speeding Ph.D. completion.
February 8, 2007
Panel's final general education plan keeps requirements on the U.S. and science, adds humanities, and eases away from religion.
February 7, 2007
University panel seeks a true track for promotion and -- in move that surprises observers -- endorses the idea of nurturing young faculty.
February 6, 2007
Archivists see dispute at SMU as chance to focus attention on whether presidential libraries are losing access to key documents.

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