Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

April 17, 2006
In church-state dispute, court says just because a university has spent federal grant doesn't mean it can't be forced to repay it.
April 17, 2006
Yale will review graduate programs, with focus on years 2-4 as key to helping students complete dissertations.
April 17, 2006
Federal appeals court ruling on U. of Arkansas helps clarify what public colleges can and can't do in regulating use of their campuses.
April 14, 2006
Effort to pick book for freshmen at Ohio State's Mansfield campus leads to accusations of bigotry and political correctness.
April 13, 2006
Biases beyond sex may be important factors for why female professors earn less, new study suggests.
April 13, 2006
Company is reconsidering rule under which it won't correct mistakes in students' favor -- but not for those in ill-fated October cohort.
April 12, 2006
U. of Michigan abandons boycott. Its officials says the company agreed to real changes, but activists say the shift is a sham.

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