Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

November 30, 2005
Author of "Reclaiming the Ivory Tower" offers his views on activism and collective bargaining for contingent faculty members.
November 29, 2005
Proposed federal guidelines urge universities to better document when researchers are doing NIH-sponsored studies.
November 29, 2005
Many colleges in recent years have eliminated majors or departments in relatively obscure fields, citing the need to focus on areas with growing student interest. Few, however, have taken the step Post University plans: eliminating majors in English and history and upper-level courses in liberal arts generally.
November 28, 2005
University reviews new course after learning of professor's anti-intelligent design comments.
November 23, 2005
With Warren County Community College's board poised to determine his fate, controversial instructor resigns.
November 22, 2005
In 1997, Elaine Seymour was one of the authors of Talking About Leaving: Why Undergraduates Leave the Sciences (Westview). She found that a reason cited by student after student -- at a range of institutions -- was poor teaching. And at many institutions, teaching assistants were a major part of the problem.
November 22, 2005
The president of Kean U. has made the campus beautiful, but many say the façade hides the way he treats people.

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