Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

October 18, 2005
Berkeley sued over Web site created by professors to help high school teachers.
October 17, 2005
Blue Mountain College announced last week that it would admit men to all of its programs, starting in January. The Mississippi college was founded in 1873 as a women's institution, but since 1956, it has admitted men as students if they are preparing for the ministry or are enrolled in non-degree programs. Blue Mountain is run by the Mississippi Baptist Convention.
October 17, 2005
President of Saint Louis U. used material for his opening homily from one last year by president of U. of San Francisco.
October 17, 2005
In buying WebCT, did course-management giant vanquish competition, or is open source the real competition?
October 14, 2005
Marquette's provost tries new approach to encourage the hiring of more minority faculty members.
October 14, 2005
In 1643, Harvard University received a gift of 100 pounds to support the education of a student who was "pious" but poor. And so American student aid was born well before the United States.

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