Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

August 17, 2005
Average for 2005 is the same as for 2004; Asian and white students show slight gains, black and Latino students show slight declines.
August 16, 2005
If you are a junior professor at Princeton and become a parent, you get an extra year before tenure review -- automatically.
August 16, 2005
Sociologists consider how to cover hot-button topics without losing control or civility.
August 15, 2005
Sociologists offer unexplored issues raised by the Harvard president's comments -- and suggestions on how colleges should change.
August 15, 2005
For decades, but especially in recent years, social scientists have been frustrated by institutional review boards, campus bodies that must approve studies involving human subjects. The IRB's, as they are called, are best known for their work on informed consent with medical research. But the boards also must approve projects in which sociologists conduct surveys or do interviews -- even though such work doesn't pose any of the dangers of, say, a drug whose side effects could be deadly.
August 12, 2005
New data show increases for total pool, women, and minority students, but drop in first-time foreign students.
August 11, 2005
U. of Wisconsin faces criticism for being unable to immediately fire faculty members who are convicted of crimes.

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