Scott McLemee

Scott McLemee is the Intellectual Affairs columnist for Inside Higher Ed. In 2008, he began a three-year term on the board of directors of the National Book Critics Circle. From 1995 until 2001, he was contributing editor for Lingua Franca. Between 2001 and 2005, he covered scholarship in the humanities as senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education. In 2005, he helped start the online news journal Inside Higher Ed, where he serves as Essayist at Large, writing a weekly column called Intellectual Affairs. His reviews, essays, and interviews have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Nation, Newsday, Bookforum, The Common Review, and numerous other publications. In 2004, he received the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing from the National Book Critics Circle. He has given papers or been an invited speaker at meetings of the American Political Science Association, the Cultural Studies Association, the Modern Language Association, and the Organization of American Historians. A selection of his work is available at his website. He is also a member of two group blogs, Crooked Timber and Cliopatria.

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Most Recent Articles

June 14, 2005
It's great to have lots of ideas for your work-in-progress, says Scott McLemee. It's also a major pain.
June 9, 2005
Academic librarians are quiet ... maybe a little too quiet.
June 2, 2005
Scott McLemee ties up some loose ends from recent columns.
May 31, 2005
In lobbying for the historical profession, it's all about the dead presidents.
May 26, 2005
Scott McLemee listens to the ethical implications of Paul Ricoeur's thought and example.
May 24, 2005
One of France's great philosophers died last week. So when do the denunciations start?
May 12, 2005
This year is the double anniversary of Sartre's birth and death. Scott McLemee finds no exit from his legacy.
May 10, 2005
Reference books are the lowest form of scholarship. That makes reading them a guilty pleasure, Scott McLemee confesses.
May 5, 2005
Right after 9/11, the obituaries started to appear: Irony, the reports said, was dead. Either that or in really bad condition.
April 28, 2005
A century after Upton Sinclair's The Jungle first appeared, a new edition of the novel proves wrenching.

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