Susan O'Doherty

Susan O'Doherty, Ph.D. (http://www.susanodohertyauthor.com/) is a writer and clinical psychologist who specializes in the creative process. Her stories and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including Mama, Ph.D. She is the author of Getting Unstuck without Coming Unglued: A Woman's Guide to Unblocking Creativity (Seal, 2007). Her popular advice column for writers, "The Doctor is In," appears each Friday on Buzz, Balls & Hype.

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Most Recent Articles

September 19, 2010
In response to last week’s post, Suzanne Sheffield commented, “Your story reiterates what I often think - as parents we should listen to that quiet but persistent inner voice that tells us that something is wrong and we SHOULD be worried.”
September 12, 2010
I had not originally intended to share this story. It felt like a private family issue; I also felt too raw to think it through clearly, much less write about it articulately.
August 29, 2010
“Clarissa” commented on last week’s post,
August 22, 2010
Aeron Haynie’s excellent post on girls and weight/eating issues made me rethink Ms. Mentor’s most recent column, “Being Nice or Getting the Job Done.” When I first read the Ms. Mentor column, it seemed like straightforward advice on a situation that is fairly common with younger employees.
August 15, 2010
Parents of high schoolers here in New York have been following the recent events at Hunter High School with interest and some anxiety.
August 8, 2010
In a recent New York Times article David Leonhardt makes a point that we on this site have been discussing for years: as the gender gap closes in terms of equal pay for equal work, mothers continue to be underemployed and struggling. The market favors those who can put in long, uninterrupted hours, weeks, and years building their careers, and those people tend to be men — whether or not they are parents—and single or childless women.
August 1, 2010
My 40th (yikes!) high school reunion is coming up, and my inbox has been clogged with correspondence about it — the official invitation, and group emails asking help in tracking down elusive classmates or compiling a representative slide show. Then there are the messages from friends, discussing whether or not to go, and why.
July 25, 2010
As noted here, I had an idyllic vacation last week. I felt nourished and even transformed by it—as sometimes happens with distance and a change of scene, I thought I had found the key to some difficult professional and personal issues that had been plaguing me. Perspective is all, I decided. I’d allowed myself to become stressed out and overwhelmed by things that, in the long run, were unimportant.
July 18, 2010
Last week I wrote about the insanity of life as a freelancer. This week I’m writing from a cabin in Maine, with no cell signal and sporadic Internet access. The cabin overlooks a quiet bay, where I swim in the mornings. You can’t see other houses in any direction, and when we turn the lights out at night, the only illumination is from the moon and the stars. In the city, I am wired and at the computer by 5AM; this morning, I slept until 9 for the first time in at least ten years.
July 11, 2010
For most of my working life — including school vacations in high school and college — I have worked at full-time, on-site jobs. This was what my father did, and my mother when she returned to work after my younger brother entered high school, and it’s how I had always defined "working." I took time off to be with my son when he was small, but that was understood to be temporary, and it was.

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