Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
December 22, 2017

In the interest of peace on earth, Scott McLemee reviews some of the metrics that attempt to gauge the existence of other forms of life in the universe.

December 15, 2017

The repression of academics in Turkey is worsening, writes Scott McLemee, who describes the growing international protest on behalf of such scholars and how one might join it.

December 8, 2017

Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide, by Cass R. Sunstein, is not an attempt to rally the public to any particular cause but rather a tribute to the Founding Fathers’ wisdom, writes Scott McLemee.

November 15, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms, in which social networks, big data, memes and the like are presented as extreme cases of the creative and disruptive potentials or our tool-oriented species.

November 8, 2017

Scott McLemee examines The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office, the first book about Trump's first year in office to be published by a scholarly press.

November 1, 2017

In We Demand: The University and Student Protests, Roderick A. Ferguson's understanding of the campus activism of the 1960s and ’70s rests on a clear sense of the university as a crucial part of the social machine, writes Scott McLemee.

October 25, 2017

Scott McLemee highlights a half dozen catchphrases that have significantly overstayed their welcome.

October 11, 2017

Claire D. Clark’s The Recovery Revolution traces the history of therapies that help drug users recover from addiction, sometimes with contradictory and controversial practices, Scott McLemee writes.

October 4, 2017

Scott McLemee examines recent scholarly discussions of mass shootings and the role that news reports play in amplifying our awareness of each increasingly horrific, yet a little less surprising, event.

September 27, 2017

Nathan Kravis’s On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch From Plato to Freud examines why that piece of furniture ever entered the analytic tradition and how its efficacy and centrality have now come under scrutiny, writes Scott McLemee.

Pages

Archive

December 22, 2017

In the interest of peace on earth, Scott McLemee reviews some of the metrics that attempt to gauge the existence of other forms of life in the universe.

December 15, 2017

The repression of academics in Turkey is worsening, writes Scott McLemee, who describes the growing international protest on behalf of such scholars and how one might join it.

December 8, 2017

Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide, by Cass R. Sunstein, is not an attempt to rally the public to any particular cause but rather a tribute to the Founding Fathers’ wisdom, writes Scott McLemee.

November 15, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms, in which social networks, big data, memes and the like are presented as extreme cases of the creative and disruptive potentials or our tool-oriented species.

November 8, 2017

Scott McLemee examines The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office, the first book about Trump's first year in office to be published by a scholarly press.

November 1, 2017

In We Demand: The University and Student Protests, Roderick A. Ferguson's understanding of the campus activism of the 1960s and ’70s rests on a clear sense of the university as a crucial part of the social machine, writes Scott McLemee.

October 25, 2017

Scott McLemee highlights a half dozen catchphrases that have significantly overstayed their welcome.

October 11, 2017

Claire D. Clark’s The Recovery Revolution traces the history of therapies that help drug users recover from addiction, sometimes with contradictory and controversial practices, Scott McLemee writes.

October 4, 2017

Scott McLemee examines recent scholarly discussions of mass shootings and the role that news reports play in amplifying our awareness of each increasingly horrific, yet a little less surprising, event.

September 27, 2017

Nathan Kravis’s On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch From Plato to Freud examines why that piece of furniture ever entered the analytic tradition and how its efficacy and centrality have now come under scrutiny, writes Scott McLemee.

Pages

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