Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
October 11, 2017

Claire D. Clark’s The Recovery Revolution traces the history of therapies that help drug users recover from addiction, sometimes with contradictory and controversial practices, Scott McLemee writes.

October 4, 2017

Scott McLemee examines recent scholarly discussions of mass shootings and the role that news reports play in amplifying our awareness of each increasingly horrific, yet a little less surprising, event.

September 27, 2017

Nathan Kravis’s On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch From Plato to Freud examines why that piece of furniture ever entered the analytic tradition and how its efficacy and centrality have now come under scrutiny, writes Scott McLemee.

September 20, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews Manhunt: Unabomber, a dramatic miniseries about Theodore Kaczynski and his capture by the FBI.

September 13, 2017

Debora Diniz’s historical and ethnographic study Zika: From the Brazilian Backlands to Global Threat illuminates the emergence of the disease and how global health organizations have dealt -- and not dealt -- with it, writes Scott McLemee.

September 6, 2017

In True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the 20th Century, Emily Skidmore describes how manhood in that day was as much a moral status as a sexual category, writes Scott McLemee.

August 30, 2017

In Newsworthy: The Supreme Court Battle Over Privacy and Press Freedom, Samantha Barbas makes clear how much Americans' views about privacy have changed over time, writes Scott McLemee.

August 23, 2017

What stands out in Linda Gordon’s The Second Coming of the KKK is that the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s tried to create a world unto itself through spectacle, mass communications and branding, writes Scott McLemee.

August 16, 2017

In The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition, Linda Gordon emphasizes broad patterns, making the book more timely than even the headlines of the past few days would suggest, writes Scott McLemee.

August 9, 2017

As we await the arrival of the next solar eclipse, Scott McLemee describes how a group of Chinese researchers bravely studied one almost 50 years ago.

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Archive

October 11, 2017

Claire D. Clark’s The Recovery Revolution traces the history of therapies that help drug users recover from addiction, sometimes with contradictory and controversial practices, Scott McLemee writes.

October 4, 2017

Scott McLemee examines recent scholarly discussions of mass shootings and the role that news reports play in amplifying our awareness of each increasingly horrific, yet a little less surprising, event.

September 27, 2017

Nathan Kravis’s On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch From Plato to Freud examines why that piece of furniture ever entered the analytic tradition and how its efficacy and centrality have now come under scrutiny, writes Scott McLemee.

September 20, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews Manhunt: Unabomber, a dramatic miniseries about Theodore Kaczynski and his capture by the FBI.

September 13, 2017

Debora Diniz’s historical and ethnographic study Zika: From the Brazilian Backlands to Global Threat illuminates the emergence of the disease and how global health organizations have dealt -- and not dealt -- with it, writes Scott McLemee.

September 6, 2017

In True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the 20th Century, Emily Skidmore describes how manhood in that day was as much a moral status as a sexual category, writes Scott McLemee.

August 30, 2017

In Newsworthy: The Supreme Court Battle Over Privacy and Press Freedom, Samantha Barbas makes clear how much Americans' views about privacy have changed over time, writes Scott McLemee.

August 23, 2017

What stands out in Linda Gordon’s The Second Coming of the KKK is that the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s tried to create a world unto itself through spectacle, mass communications and branding, writes Scott McLemee.

August 16, 2017

In The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition, Linda Gordon emphasizes broad patterns, making the book more timely than even the headlines of the past few days would suggest, writes Scott McLemee.

August 9, 2017

As we await the arrival of the next solar eclipse, Scott McLemee describes how a group of Chinese researchers bravely studied one almost 50 years ago.

Pages

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