Higher Education Webinars

Academic Minute

Inside Higher Ed is pleased to bring you The Academic Minute. The brainchild of Albany's WAMC and its president, Alan Chartock, The Academic Minute features professors from top institutions around the country, delving into topics from the serious to the light-hearted, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy with topics ranging from updates on groundbreaking scientific research to an explanation of how the board game Monopoly can help explain the economic recession.

The Academic Minute features a different professor every day, drawing experts from institutions within WAMC's listening area and across the country. Each segment is introduced by Lynn Pasquerella, president of the Association of American Colleges & Universities. Pasquerella is the former president of Mount Holyoke College.

Are you a professor who would like to record an Academic Minute? Let us know about your latest research at academicminute@wamc.org

The Theme: The Academic Minute opens with a selection by WAMC contributor and renowned cellist Yehuda Hanani, who appears on Classical Music According to Yehuda during The Roundtable. The piece is Bach's Suite No. 2 in D Minor.

Production support for The Academic Minute comes from the Association of American Colleges & Universities.


October 21, 2016
Could modern conspiracy theories be traced back to ancient Rome? In today's Academic Minute, the University of Florida's Victoria Pagan delves into whether ancient examples can relate to present day theories.
October 20, 2016
Should the electoral college be abolished? In today's Academic Minute, American Public University's Stephen Schwalbe details why that might not be the best course of action.
October 19, 2016
What do Aristotle and sound bites have in common? In today's Academic Minute, Vassar College's Curtis Dozier explores whether candidates use Aristotle’s teachings when appealing to voters.


April 2, 2014
The undersea discovery of a large seep of methane in the North Atlantic may hold the key to learning a great deal about the underwater ecosystem.
April 1, 2014
Whether you realize it or not, we use distance metaphors every day. In today’s Academic Minute, Dartmouth College's Thalia Wheatley explores the way humans use figurative language to convey abstract ideas.
March 31, 2014
Despite all the advances in technology, Mother Nature remains our most skilled engineer. In today’s Academic Minute, the University of the Pacific's Craig Vierra is trying to replicate spider silk.
March 28, 2014
What can we extrapolate from the cries of a baby? In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Miami's Neil Johnson examined the patterns of children's cries and uses that information to make some interesting conclusions.
March 27, 2014
The complexity of human culture is highly nuanced. In today’s Academic Minute, Newcastle University's Daniel Nettle examines striking cultural differences even in people living geographically close to one another.


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