Higher Education Webinars

Academic Minute

Inside Higher Ed is pleased to bring you The Academic Minute. The brainchild of Albany's WAMC and its president, Alan Chartock, The Academic Minute features professors from top institutions around the country, delving into topics from the serious to the light-hearted, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy with topics ranging from updates on groundbreaking scientific research to an explanation of how the board game Monopoly can help explain the economic recession.

The Academic Minute features a different professor every day, drawing experts from institutions within WAMC's listening area and across the country. Each segment is introduced by Lynn Pasquerella, president of the Association of American Colleges & Universities. Pasquerella is the former president of Mount Holyoke College.

Are you a professor who would like to record an Academic Minute? Let us know about your latest research at academicminute@wamc.org

The Theme: The Academic Minute opens with a selection by WAMC contributor and renowned cellist Yehuda Hanani, who appears on Classical Music According to Yehuda during The Roundtable. The piece is Bach's Suite No. 2 in D Minor.

Production support for The Academic Minute comes from the Association of American Colleges & Universities.


October 20, 2016
Should the electoral college be abolished? In today's Academic Minute, American Public University's Stephen Schwalbe details why that might not be the best course of action.
October 19, 2016
What do Aristotle and sound bites have in common? In today's Academic Minute, Vassar College's Curtis Dozier explores whether candidates use Aristotle’s teachings when appealing to voters.
October 18, 2016
Are we being brainwashed? In today's Academic Minute, the University of Arizona's Scott Selisker examines if we are as free thinking as we think we are.


July 11, 2016
How does the brain recognize the words you read? In today's Academic Minute, John Henderson of the University of California, Davis, explains how finding out the answer could help people who have difficulty reading.
July 8, 2016
Gothic novels and architecture have always had an appeal in the United States. In today's Academic Minute, SUNY New Paltz's Kerry Dean Carso examines this art form and what makes the mysterious exciting.
July 7, 2016
How do you study monkeys that you can’t see? In today's Academic Minute, Winthrop University's Janice Chism describes looking for meaning in saki monkey calls to observe this bashful breed.
July 6, 2016
Preventing genocide is one of our biggest challenges. In today's Academic Minute, Keene State College's James Waller says a human problem has a human solution.
July 5, 2016
Selective attention is a key practice to help us process our busy world. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Toronto's Eric Taylor discusses the two modes of information selecting we use and whether they’re automatic.


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