Colleges Join ACE's Alternative Credit Consortium

The American Council on Education this week announced that 15 more colleges have joined an alternative credit consortium the higher-education umbrella group created last year. The new institutions will join 25 other colleges -- collectively representing a broad swath of higher education -- that have agreed to accept all or most of the transfer credit students seek after successfully completing courses from a council-created pool of about 100 low-cost online courses. The pool includes courses offered by online institutions and nontraditional providers. ACE is collecting data and tracking success rates of students who transfer in with consortium-approved course credits.

"This project already is yielding enormous benefits, adding to our body of knowledge about the most effective ways to go about increasing the number of Americans able to earn a college degree or credential by using education, training and life experiences gained outside of a formal higher education classroom," said Molly Corbett Broad, ACE's president, in a written statement.

Salem State, Montserrat College of Art Rule Out Merger

After months of discussions of a possible merger, Salem State University and Montserrat College of Art announced Tuesday that they will remain independent. “Montserrat College of Art is an exceptional, small art college with an outstanding faculty and programs that Salem State would have been pleased to add to its curriculum, but the numbers just didn’t work at this time,” said a statement from Salem State's president, Patricia Maguire Meservey.

For-profit association's challenges and changes mirror that of sector

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Big changes for APSCU, the for-profit trade group, which has lost most of its large-chain members and plans to focus again on career education.

Florida State Vows to Improve Conduct of Athletes

Florida State University President John Thrasher met with the football team Monday (at right) and urged players to pay more attention to their behavior off the field, CBS Sports reported. In a statement after the meeting, Thrasher said: "In light of recent off-field incidents, I reiterated to our players that they simply cannot put themselves in situations that reflect poor behavior or cause harm to others. They must remember that playing football for FSU is a privilege, not a right. The actions of a few have the capacity to do serious damage to the reputation of our entire university." Earlier this month two football players -- one subsequently dismissed from the team -- were charged in separate incidents with striking women, one in a bar and one outside a bar.

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Essay on finding common ground in debate over digital courseware

The mudslinging in the debate over the use of digital courseware has reached Hatfield-and-McCoy levels of feuding. I have heard at least one higher education leader say, “The only faculty that are afraid of being replaced by digital courseware are those who deserve to be replaced by digital courseware.” Also heard are descriptors such as: rigid, skeptical, curmudgeon, Luddite, etc. On the other side, there are the “reformers” and “disruptive innovators” who are criticized for seeing technology as a panacea.

The enthusiastic debate about digital courseware’s adoption and its impact on student outcomes is caused in part by mounting pressure on faculty to change and, especially, to use more technology in their teaching. Too often, though, faculty are considered as a monolithic group, facing the same challenges across many different types of institutions and student populations. Our research shows that this oversimplifies the perspectives of faculty and the challenges that institutions and instructors face as they grapple with elevated outcome expectations and capacity constraints.

There is more texture to the debate than the view that it’s about brash proponents of using digital courseware squaring off with change-resistant opponents. And this oversimplification sprouts problems beyond mischaracterizations of faculty. The common belief that faculty members are blockers to digital curriculum adoption pushes those who are attempting to advance technology use on campus to adopt strategies that circumvent faculty members instead of directly engaging them. This creates a harmful cycle in which the concerns of faculty members are not addressed, new platforms are created or adopted with incomplete information, and administrators and faculty members on both sides of the technology-adoption debate remain frustrated.

So, what’s really behind faculty members’ resistance? Fundamentally, most faculty are open to using digital courseware, but are so dissatisfied with the prevailing user experience that they are unlikely to recommend their current digital curriculum to a colleague. In surveying 2,700 faculty and administrators in the summer of 2014, our research identified four unique faculty groups on campuses across the United States. Common attributes, behaviors and mind-sets among faculty in these groups help to uncover the layers underneath faculty members’ perspectives on digital curricula. Below is a chart that will help you identify which group you or your faculty fit into, and a snapshot of our findings on each group.

Off-the-Shelfers: This group is moderately open to the use of courseware. They represent 21 percent of faculty. Off-the-Shelfers are more heavily concentrated in public two-year institutions and career-focused disciplines. These individuals value ease of use and implementation and are less inclined to develop their own curricula than their peers. Additionally, analysis links their cost sensitivity to this institutional and discipline concentration.

Unconvinced Do-It-Yourselfers: This group is open to the use of courseware but is still looking for proven improved outcomes. They represent 25 percent of faculty. Unconvinced DIYers want control over curriculum decisions and are open to how courseware might enable this, however, they are not yet convinced that the cost of using courseware is worth the potential benefits.

Enthusiastic Do-It-Yourselfers: At 13 percent of the population, Enthusiastic DIYers look very similar to Unconvinced DIYers in their perceptions and preferences, but they report higher satisfaction with digital courseware than their peers. Generally, Enthusiastic DIYers have not earned tenure or are not on a tenure track and have been teaching for fewer than 10 years.

Lecturing Skeptics: Representing 31 percent of all faculty, Lecturing Skeptics are the faculty most likely to deliver instruction through a lecture format, the least likely to instruct online. They are most likely to prefer proven teaching methods. These are the more traditional drivers of the teaching and learning process, to whom digital courseware has yet to prove itself. Lecturing Skeptics are more likely to teach in arts and social science disciplines than members of other segments.

When faculty survey respondents were asked whether they would recommend their courseware product to a friend or colleague at their own or another institution, only one of the four segments, Enthusiastic DIYers, exhibited a positive net promoter score (NPS), meaning that a greater portion of the group would be promoters of courseware than would be detractors. The negative NPS from three of the four groups of faculty reflects the overall level of dissatisfaction with courseware that faculty members feel.

What does this all mean? Ultimately, we found that each faculty group reveals insights that can be used to engage with those who are unconvinced and skeptical. For courseware developers, these findings are a loud call to rethink their approach to user input in their design process. The truth is that faculty are decision makers and key stakeholders. They have influence to redefine the courseware category and to improve the experience for students and faculty. More than anything, internal and external stakeholders and decision makers need to understand these faculty groups and what is driving their behavior. Ongoing failure to listen and respond to faculty needs will only reinforce resistance.

Digital curricula in the hands of supported and equipped instructors have significant potential to personalize learning and to lead to the delivery of high-quality education that meets the needs of today’s postsecondary students. But that impact will only be realized if technology solutions are able to successfully scale. New offerings with greater capacity to adapt to faculty needs are unlikely to transition from pilot to scale unless more than just the early adopters or “tech-savvy” faculty are engaged from the beginning.

The legendary 1870s feud between West Virginia families the Hatfields and the McCoys -- from disputes over land, prized pigs, interfamily romances and no fewer than 10 revenge killings -- wasn’t a simple one, either. (But the families did reunite in 1979 for a more palatable version on the game show Family Feud -- no joke!) Only by moving the conversation from oversimplified mischaracterizations to engagement of all faculty in the process to address needs and the barriers to adoption will we be able to redefine the digital courseware experience and achieve personalized learning for all students.

Gates Bryant is a partner with Tyton Partners, the former Education Growth Advisors, which provides investment banking and strategy consulting services to companies, organizations and investors.

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Feds Halt Collections on Corinthian Students in Default

The U.S. Department of Education will halt collections on student loans for roughly 40,000 former Corinthian students who are in default, Reuters reported. A group of former Corinthian students has asked a federal bankruptcy court judge to temporarily suspend debt payments for up to 350,000 students who attended the collapsed for-profit chain during the last five years. A lawyer for the group last week told Reuters that the department would not collect on defaulted loans for 120 days. During that time the lawyer said he hopes to negotiate debt relief for all former Corinthian students.

New presidents or provosts: Buffalo Columbia Drexel Edison Manhattanville NVCC SAIC UT-Austin Wytheville

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  • M. Brian Blake, vice provost for academic affairs and dean of the University of Miami Graduate School, in Florida, has been appointed provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Drexel University, in Pennsylvania.

Lumina-Funded 'Credential Registry'

The Lumina Foundation is funding a $2.25 million project to create a credential registry, which will help users compare the quality and value of credentials, including college degrees and industry certifications. The web-based system will receive credential information directly from issuing institutions. Its creators hope to create several applications, including one that will allow for the review of competency-based transcripts and portfolios that are based on transfer policies.

Other institutions that are participating in the registry's creation include George Washington University's Institute of Public Policy, Workcred (an affiliate of the American National Standards Institute) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale’s Center for Workforce Development.

NCAA to Lift South Carolina Ban After Confederate Flag Comes Down

After 13 years, South Carolina will once again be allowed to host National Collegiate Athletic Association basketball tournaments and other championship games after state lawmakers voted Thursday to remove the Confederate flag from the state capitol grounds.

Since 2001, the NCAA has barred any state that flies the Confederate flag from bidding to host NCAA championships where host sites are preselected. That includes sports like men's and women's basketball, but not baseball. South Carolina last hosted an NCAA men's basketball tournament in 2002, before the ban went into effect.

"We commend South Carolina lawmakers for taking this action to remove the Confederate flag from the Capitol grounds," Kirk Schulz, chair of the NCAA board of governors and president of Kansas State University, said in a statement. "For nearly 15 years we have specifically protested the flag by not allowing states like South Carolina to host preselected NCAA championships. With this impending change, and consistent with our policy, South Carolina may bid to host future NCAA championships once the flag no longer flies at the State House grounds."

The flag is expected to come down Friday. Mississippi is now the sole remaining state that cannot host NCAA championships under the rule.

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Report: Campus Crime Drops 25 Percent Since 2001

On-campus crime has fallen by 25 percent over the last decade, from more than 40,000 reported incidents in 2001 to fewer than 30,000 incidents in 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Education's annual report of crime statistics.

The number of reported on-campus crimes was lower in 2012 than 2001 in every category except for "forcible sex offenses," the report stated. The number of reported forcible sex offenses increased by 77 percent, from 2,200 in 2001 to 3,900 in 2012. That's a 15 percent increase from 2011, when 3,400 forcible sex offenses were reported. Arrests for drug law violations have increased by 76 percent since 2001, and arrests for liquor law violations have increased by 8 percent.

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