administrators

Erskine struggles to find a president who meets its religious requirements

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Erskine's presidential search falls apart when the finalist on the verge of being selected is deemed unacceptable by some because he is a Baptist.

Bloomberg Calls for More Tolerance of Diverse Ideas

Colleges need to do a better job of promoting tolerance of diverse ideas, said Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, in a Harvard University commencement address Thursday, The Boston Globe reported. Bloomberg cited incidents in which students have questioned selections of commencement speakers or shouted down speakers on campus, and noted that this problem goes beyond campus as well. “Tolerance for other people’s ideas and the freedom to express your own are ... perpetually vulnerable to the tyrannical tendencies of monarchs, mobs, and majorities, and lately we’ve seen those tendencies manifest themselves too often, both on college campuses and in our society," he said. Bloomberg added that  “a liberal arts education must not be the art of liberalism."

Some Harvard students this spring questioned whether Bloomberg should be invited to speak. They cited the "stop and frisk" police tactic used in New York City while he was mayor. But many other students -- including some who questioned the tactic -- defended his right to speak.

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Lousiana lawmakers wanted more authority over the state higher ed chief, now they may give it back

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Louisiana lawmakers wanted more authority over the state's top higher education official. Now, some want to give it back.

New presidents or provosts: Kankakee Madison Rock Valley SVSU SDSU SJU Saint Rose Wilkes

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  • Michael Boyd, associate dean of English, humanities and language studies at Illinois Central College, has been appointed as vice president for instruction and student success at Kankakee Community College, also in Illinois.

Yeshiva Looks to Partnership to Control Costs at Einstein College of Medicine

Yeshiva University is looking to help rectify some of its financial difficulties by giving up day-to-day operations of its Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the university announced Tuesday.

Yeshiva wants to form a new entity with its longtime partner that runs the university hospital at the medical college, the Montefiore Health System. Shortfalls at the university as a whole have been driven by operations at the medical college.

Under the planned arrangement, Montefiore will take “greater responsibility for the day-to-day operations and financial management” of the medical college while Yeshiva will remain the degree-granting institution for it, the university and the health system said in a news release. The university’s trustees and the health system’s board leadership have endorsed the plan, but there is not yet a final agreement and that agreement would then be subject to regulatory approval. 

At Saint Joseph's U., no confidence votes across the board

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Faculty at Saint Joseph's University have taken vote after vote expressing dismay in their administrators.

New presidents or provosts: Alvin Guilford Newbury Pepperdine USF Valdosta

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  • Christal Albrecht, president of Florida State College at Jacksonville's Kent Campus. has been chosen as president of Alvin College, in Texas.
  • Joseph L. Chillo Jr., executive vice president at Newbury College, in Massachusetts, has been named president there.

Essay on why college presidents need to consider their role in gun control debates

It's Memorial Day. Few of us are working. Most colleges and universities have gone into summer mode. And yet, tragedy has landed on our doorsteps once again. I actually had to Google "Newtown" to remind myself when that tragic set of murders had occurred (it was December 14, 2012). And every day since, on average, 289 people have been shot in this country. Eighty-six of those shot die from gunshot wounds. Let's do the math. That's over 150,000 shot and nearly 50,000 killed.

While these victims come from all parts of American society, colleges and universities are among the places that have mourned the dead – from Virginia Tech to the University of California at Santa Barbara. And college campuses have been where many pro-gun activists have sought, many of them successfully, to fight gun control.

Today, there are far more guns in people's hands in America than there were even 18 months ago. Over 200 million guns in the hands of individual Americans presumably keep us safe, and yet if more guns were the answer, we certainly wouldn't be seeing the number of gun-related deaths that we do.

Eighteen months ago, hundreds of college and university presidents came forward together and called for saner gun laws in this country. There are at least two things remarkable about that activism. First, it represented a rare moment for the leaders of institutions of higher education -- one in which we chose to speak out collectively on an issue of public importance only tangentially related to our primary mission of education.  Second, at the national level and in many states like my own, Georgia, it didn't appear many legislators listened. As just one example, churches in Georgia have now been given the ability to welcome parishioners into their sanctuaries armed, locked and loaded.

We presidents have been largely silent since Newtown, on the issue of gun regulation and on most other significant issues facing our country – at least those issues not directly related to college budgets. The gun safety movement sparked a good bit of discussion among my colleagues on a president's role in the public discourse. I've certainly heard both sides of that issue expressed, even by my own Board of Trustees. Yet I still come out on the side of Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, former president of the University of Notre Dame, who memorably said, "How can we encourage students to speak out unless we have the courage to do so ourselves"? I received a personal note from Father Hesburgh, thanking me for being willing to set an example for our students, but most importantly, I felt I had given my colleagues and myself an opportunity to find our voice.

Which brings me to my next question: Is it time for us to speak out again?

Last night, in an almost unbearable news conference Richard Martinez, father of a beautiful, friendly, promising and now-slain 20-year old student at the University of California at Santa Barbara, Christopher Martin-Martinez, had this to say:

“Why did Chris die? Chris died because of craven, irresponsible politicians and the N.R.A. They talk about gun rights. What about Chris’s right to live? When will this insanity stop? When will enough people say, ‘Stop this madness; we don’t have to live like this?’ Too many have died. We should say to ourselves: not one more.”

When I was starting College Presidents for Gun Safety, one of the concerns I heard was the idea there were just too many issues on which to articulate an opinion. Where would it stop? Where would we draw the line? In light of this latest tragedy, on a college campus that could have been any of ours,  I would say: "We are nowhere near the line yet. Let's worry about that one when we get closer."

Lawrence Schall is president of Oglethorpe University.

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Flowers left at a U. of California Santa Barbara sorority house where students were shot Friday

Faculty Layoffs at Hawaii Pacific U.

Hawaii Pacific University is eliminating the jobs of about 7 percent of full-time faculty members to deal with a 10 percent decline in enrollment, Hawaii News Now reported. University officials said that they needed to realign resources to focus on programs that could grow.

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Protest as Napolitano Gives Commencement Speech

Some students at Laney College -- a community college in Oakland -- protested before and during commencement because the main speaker was Janet Napolitano, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Napolitano is currently the president of the University of California system, but the protest focused on what students said were hostile policies toward immigrants when she was U.S. secretary of homeland security. During her talk, some heckled to the point that some in the audience said that they could not hear Napolitano. One protest organizer said that this was a victory. "No one could hear her as she was speaking, the whole time.... It was a very proud day for Oakland -- we made it clear that she was not welcome at Laney College. It was an insult, it never should have happened."

A spokesman for Napolitano said that the heckling was "particularly disappointing" because the speech started with a reference to the killings near the University of California at Santa Barbara Friday night.

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