administrators

Former Football Player Sues UNC Over Fake Courses

Michael McAdoo, formerly a football player at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has sued the institution, saying that by guiding him (and other athletes) to fake courses, it deprived him of an education, the Associated Press reported. The suit seeks to become a class action on behalf of other athletes who were steered into fake courses. The lawsuit says that coaches and others "enticed these football student-athletes to sign the agreements with promises of a legitimate UNC education.... Instead, UNC systematically funneled its football student-athletes into a 'shadow curriculum' of bogus courses which never met and which were designed for the sole purpose of providing enrollees high grades."

 

Ad keywords: 

Ex-Head of Foundation Pleads Guilty to Embezzlement

The former executive director of the foundation that raises money for the Los Angeles Trade Technical College pleaded guilty Friday to felony embezzlement, The Los Angeles Times reported. Jiah "Rhea" Chung, 44, admitted that she took $50,500. She was sentenced to three years of formal probation and 60 days of work for CalTrans. But her lawyer questioned the fairness of the judicial findings. He questioned why some foundation officials denied that they authorized the payments. "The political climate is such that it’s so hard for anybody accused of any public integrity crime to get a fair hearing," the lawyer said. "You’re looking at a woman who really physically can’t fathom being able to withstand even a single day in prison."

Asexual student groups growing more common on campuses

Smart Title: 

Some college centers that serve marginalized sexual or gender identities are officially recognizing another in their names and program offerings. 

6 Indiana Basketball Players Cited for Alcohol or Drugs

Six Indiana University men's basketball players have been cited for alcohol violations or have failed drug tests this year, including a student who was hospitalized Saturday after being struck by a vehicle driven by a teammate. That player had also been drinking, and neither student is of legal drinking age. Two other players were cited for underage consumption in April after trying to use false identification to enter a bar during the traditionally raucous weekend of IU's Little 500 bicycle race. One of those same players was suspended from the team this week after failing a drug test, as was a second player. In February, another player was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated.

The news inspired several editorials this week, both locally and nationally, calling for IU coach Tom Crean to get his team under control or to be fired. "This isn't a problem," wrote the Indianapolis Star columnist Gregg Doyel. "This is an epidemic. And it falls on Crean for two reasons. One, he recruited these guys. Every one of them. He and his staff identified them in high school, targeted them, got to know them, signed them, brought them here. Screwed that up, clearly.

"Two, he's now their coach. Not their father, but something close to a father figure. As close as it gets on a college campus, honestly. He's their leader, mentor, role model. Or he should be. And if he's not? He's doing something wrong."

Ad keywords: 

Utah State Fired Administrator for Misconduct With Student

Utah State University fired Marvin Roberts, the university’s assistant vice president of student engagement and diversity, over allegations that he assaulted a student, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. According to a copy of the letter of dismissal, the student -- about 40 years younger than Roberts -- reported feeling pressured into sexual acts with Roberts, and that she stopped him eventually by saying she is a lesbian. He said that the interaction was consensual, and that he stopped short of intercourse when she indicated her sexual orientation. A lawyer for Roberts did not respond to an inquiry from the Tribune. The dismissal letter said that he had not attempted to refute the allegations.

 

Ad keywords: 

U. of California Wants to Resume Tuition Increases

Leaders of the University of California System, for the first time in four years, are proposing tuition increases, The Los Angeles Times reported. Officials say that increases of 5 percent a year are needed to provide more funds for a variety of goals, including increasing the number of California residents that the system's campuses admit. The proposal is expected to face skepticism from Governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, and students.

 

New presidents or provosts: AB Tech Bacone Fort Smith Kingsborough Lone Star Monmouth NJCU Sul Ross

Smart Title: 
  • Georgia Hale, associate provost at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith, has been promoted to provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs there.
  • Steve Head, president of Lone Star College's North Harris campus, in Texas, has been named chancellor of the Lone Star College System.

2 Universities Reach Different Conclusions on Founder

The University of Denver has released a report examining the role of John Evans (at right, from Wikipedia), its founder, in the 1864 massacre of members of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes while Evans was governor of the Colorado territory. The report finds that Evans was culpable for the massacre, and proposes a number of steps the university should take (and that are being considered) to make this history clear and to honor the memories of those who were killed in what has come to be known as the Sand Creek Massacre. The report differs from a similar study produced last year for Northwestern University, the other institution Evans founded. That report, while critical of Evans for his failure to prevent the massacre or to discuss it honestly, stopped short of saying he was responsible for it.

 

Ad keywords: 

U. of Kansas asks court to reconsider expulsion ruling

Smart Title: 

Did the U. of Kansas overstep its bounds when it expelled a student for harassing an ex-girlfriend online, or was it acting on instructions from the federal government?

NCAA Had Doubts on Its Authority in Penn State Case

The National Collegiate Athletic Association doubted whether it had the authority to punish Pennsylvania State University over the Jerry Sandusky child abuse scandal, according to internal emails recently made public as part of an ongoing court case.

In one email, the sanctions eventually imposed by the NCAA against Penn State were described as an attempt to "bluff" the college. “I characterized our approach to PSU as a bluff when talking to [NCAA president Mark Emmert] yesterday afternoon after the call," wrote Julie Roe, the NCAA's then-director of enforcement. "He basically agreed b/c I think he understands that if we make this an enforcement issue, we may win the immediate battle but lose the war when the COI (Committee on Infractions) has to rule. I think he is okay with that risk.”

In another email, Kevin Lennon, the NCAA's vice president of academic and membership affairs, said that Penn State would accept the association's punishment because the university was "so embarrassed they will do anything." The NCAA eventually decided to vacate years of Penn State wins, suspend the university from participating in postseason games, and fine the institution $60 million. The historic punishment was criticized by some at the time as an overreach of the association's authority.

The NCAA ended Penn State's postseason ban in September, two years earlier than what the sanction had originally called for.

"Debate and thorough consideration is central in any organization, and that clearly is reflected in the selectively released emails," the NCAA said in a statement Wednesday. "The national office staff routinely provides information and counsel to the membership on tough issues. The NCAA carefully examined its authority and responsibility to act in response to the athletics department’s role detailed in the Freeh report. Ultimately, advised by all information gathered the Executive Committee determined to act and move forward with the Consent Decree."

University officials said that they found it "deeply disturbing that NCAA officials in leadership positions would consider bluffing one of their member institutions, Penn State, to accept sanctions outside of their normal investigative and enforcement process."

Ad keywords: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - administrators
Back to Top