administrators

Provost who opposed Mount St. Mary's president's plan to cull students loses his job

Smart Title: 

Highest official at Mount St. Mary's of Maryland who opposed president's plan to cull students loses his job. Appointee as interim provost received no-confidence vote at another institution.

Suffolk president will stay until start of 2017-18 year

Smart Title: 

Margaret McKenna will stay on as president, but only until start of 2017-18 year. In interview, she discusses what happened. Board chair who pushed to oust her is out in May.

Academic Alleges Discriminatory Hiring Practices

Are many academic job ads discriminatory to people with disabilities? That’s what David Perry, a professor of history at Dominican University, alleges in a new op-ed in Al Jazeera called “Disabled People Need Not Apply.” Perry argues that academe, despite its focus on inclusion, is a regular offender when it comes to job ads that exclude large groups of people. “I found around 60 current advertisements, including faculty, staff and administrative positions, at diverse types of universities,” Perry wrote of the analysis on which his piece was based. “At many institutions, every job posting receives one of these clauses, despite many positions being perfectly suited to individuals with all types of bodies, senses and minds.”

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock, for example, regularly inserts the following clause into job ads (including one for a professor of French), Perry wrote: “Sedentary Work -- Exerting 10 pounds: Occasionally, Kneeling: Occasionally, Climbing (Stairs, Ladders, etc.): Occasionally, Lifting 10-25 lbs.: Occasionally, Carrying 5-10 lbs.: Occasionally, Pushing/pulling 5-10 lbs.: Occasionally, Sitting for long periods of time: Occasionally, Standing for long periods of time: Occasionally, Speaking; Essential, Hearing: Essential, Vision: Ability to distinguish similar colors, depth perception, close vision: Essential, Walking -- Short Distances: Frequently.”

Even the Director of Diversity and Inclusion at Tarrant County College District, an office that includes oversight over disability issues, must be able to meet “physical demands” such as the need to “sit; use hands to finger, handle or feel objects, tools or controls; reach with hands and arms; and talk or hear,” Perry wrote. “What’s more, the employee is ‘occasionally required to stand; walk; climb or balance; stoop, kneel, crouch or crawl; and taste or smell,’ as well as ‘frequently lift and/or move up to 10 pounds and occasionally lift and/or move up to 25 pounds.’ And ‘Specific vision abilities required by this job include close vision, distance vision, color vision, peripheral vision, depth perception and the ability to adjust focus.’”

Sam Crane, director of public policy at the Autistic Self Advocacy Network and a disability rights lawyer, told Perry that some of the ads were likely illegal, and that an employer cannot simply list categories that exclude wide swaths of disabled Americans without a very strong reason.

Perry said he was hoping to start a conversation about hiring best practices. “Unintentional discrimination is still discrimination,” he wrote. “Boilerplate clauses keep disabled people from even applying for jobs. ‘Requirement creep,’ likely put in place by [human resources] professionals eager to avoid trouble, exacerbates discrimination and could, if someone had the time and money, lead to legal trouble.” Without deliberate change, he wrote, “unemployment will continue to be the biggest problem facing Americans with disabilities. It’s time for employers to take a hard look at their hiring practices.”

Ad keywords: 

Wisconsin Panel Approves New Draft Tenure Rules

The University of Wisconsin System moved a step closer Friday to approving new policies related to tenure -- policies that continue to worry faculty members. With little discussion, the Education Committee of the system’s Board of Regents unanimously voted to recommend draft policies on tenure and processes for layoffs or termination, paving the way for the full board to vote on the policies next month. The new policies were drafted by a system task force after Wisconsin’s Legislature voted last year to strike strong protections for tenured faculty from state statute, but faculty members say the new system-based policies still fall short of meeting American Association of University Professors-recommended standards. John Behling, the board’s vice president and chair of the system’s Tenure Policy Task Force, said the policies were drafted to reaffirm the board’s commitment to strong tenure and academic freedom while also increasing “accountability” to taxpayers. “Without that demonstration of accountability, whether real or perceived, our budget prospects in future years will not improve,” Behling added.

Tenure has been a touchy subject in recent months in Wisconsin due to the changes. That’s part of the reason faculty members objected strongly to a survey of their views on tenure this fall by the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute, which has in the past endorsed conservative positions on state policy issues. Despite the controversy, the institute is back at it with a new survey concerning tenure -- this time of non-tenure-track faculty members in the university system. The survey includes such questions as, “In order to receive tenure, you have to take a lower salary. How much of a reduction in your annual salary (keeping your workload constant) would you be willing to take to receive tenure?” and "Would increasing the proportion of classes taught by nontenured instructors harm or improve the overall quality of instruction in your department?" Some faculty members have complained that some questions seem to encourage answers that suggest more faculty members should be off the tenure track.

But Mike Nichols, president of the institute, said this new survey was an effort to gather information on tenure from an entirely new group of respondents -- instructional staff. He shared a letter he sent to Behling last year, attempting to dispel some of what he called the “misinformation” surrounding the institute’s efforts. The letter says neither the institute nor the scholar conducting the survey had any preconceived notions regarding findings, and that the survey will “allow all Wisconsinites an opportunity to sift and winnow all objective information pertinent to a live policy debate.”

Ad keywords: 

Programs have success helping low-income students graduate

Smart Title: 

Two new studies suggest many colleges may be too quick to write off low-income students and community college transfers. Money and extra support change the equation, at least for some.

Meningitis on three campuses leads to one outbreak and one death

Smart Title: 

Cases of meningitis at three universities have sickened four students -- three in a single outbreak -- and led to death of one employee.

Chicago State U Declares Financial Exigency

Chicago State University on Thursday declared that it was in a state of financial exigency due to the state failing to adopt a budget and provide funds, The Chicago Tribune reported. All public colleges and universities in the state have been voicing concerns about the impact of the state's inaction, but Chicago State has been warning that it may run out of money by next month. A state of financial exigency, under guidelines of the American Association of University Professors, means that a college's financial condition is so dire as to justify speedier elimination of faculty jobs, including tenured faculty jobs.

Purdue Anti-Abortion Group Targets Black Cultural Center

An anti-abortion student group at Purdue University targeted the university's Black Cultural Center Tuesday with a series of messages written in chalk, angering many on campus who said the messages were racist and sexist in nature. "All lives matter," the group wrote. "Womb = most dangerous place 4 black kids. Planned Parenthood = #1 killer of black babies. Civils rights begins in the womb." [sic]

"The not-so-subtle meaning behind these messages is that if women of color, specifically black women, exercise their legal right to have an abortion, they are committing a form of self-induced genocide," the Purdue Social Justice Coalition, a student and faculty group, said in a statement. "Aside from the typical sexist nature of these messages, which deny women's autonomy over their own bodies and reproductive choices, what happened at Purdue also reflects racism on campus. Contrary to the idea that 'All Lives Matter,' women of color were specifically targeted with these messages and singled out."

In a statement Wednesday, the group responsible for the messages, Purdue Students for Life, defended its actions, saying they chose to focus on the Black Cultural Center "in light of Black History Month" and the "fact that abortion and the industry that surrounds it disproportionately affects and harms the black community."

"Regarding the recent flyers and chalking, what we're finding is that there has been a lot of misinterpretation and misunderstanding of our intended message, and because of that, unfortunately some people's feelings have been hurt," the group, which currently has no black members, stated. "This is not about shaming anyone. It's about human equality and the fact that all human lives have dignity that cannot be taken away, be they black or white, male or female, born or preborn."

The Purdue Black Cultural Center did not respond to requests for comment Thursday.

Stanford Names New President

Stanford University announced Thursday that its next president will be Marc Tessier-Lavigne, a neuroscientist who is currently president of Rockefeller University. He will succeed John L. Hennessy, who announced in June 2015 that he would step down after 16 years as president. Previously, Tessier-Lavigne was a professor of biological sciences at Stanford and at the University of California at San Francisco. A biography may be found here.

Ad keywords: 

No Confidence at City Colleges Chicago, U of Akron

Faculty members have voted no confidence in the leaders of City Colleges of Chicago and the University of Akron.

At City Colleges of Chicago, faculty leaders say Chancellor Cheryl Hyman makes decisions about important issues such as tuition, registration regulations and various other matters without consulting with the faculty, The Chicago Tribune reported. Many political and business leaders in Chicago back the chancellor.

At Akron, the Faculty Senate voted no confidence in President Scott L. Scarborough, citing numerous decisions he has made that they argue have hurt the university's academic and financial base, Ohio.com reported. Scarborough spoke early in the meeting where the vote took place but left before the vote.

Ad keywords: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - administrators
Back to Top