administrators

As number of gay presidents increases, they try to pave way for others

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As their numbers increase, they are stepping up efforts to further break a glass ceiling for LGBTQ academics.

Top Football Recruits on Unions, Pay and Concussions

ESPN released the results of a poll of the 300 top high school football recruits this year (of which more than 150 responded). Among the results:

  • 60 percent believe college athletes should be able to unionize.
  • 86 percent believe players should receive stipends.
  • 61 percent would play with a concussion.
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Interim Leader Named Next President of Howard U.

The board of Howard University has tapped the interim president, Wayne A.I. Frederick, to take on the position on a permanent basis. Frederick holds three degrees from Howard. He was 16 when he first enrolled, traveling from his native Trinidad, seeking a career as a physician. At Howard, Frederick taught in the medical school and was a surgeon at the hospital before rising through the ranks of academic administration. The historically black university has struggled financially in recent years. In an October interview with The Washington Post, Frederick expressed confidence that the university was working through its financial difficulties.

 

Faculty members at Upper Iowa U. say they lost jobs for questioning curricular changes

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Terminated tenure-track faculty members at Upper Iowa University say they were punished for voicing their concerns about proposed curricular changes.

Higher education urged to play more of a role in Common Core

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Colleges and universities need to get involved in the the rollout of the Common Core curriculum, argues a new paper from the New America Foundation.

 

U.S. Urged to Require Colleges to Publicize Availability of Nurse Examiners

Colleges should be required to inform sexual assault survivors that nurse examiners, both on campus and in nearby communities, are available to them, two senators told the U.S. Department of Education Monday.

Senators Mark Udall, a Democrat from Colorado, and Claire McCaskill, a Democrat from Missouri, urged the department to include the requirement in the rules implementing the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act. The department already proposes that colleges and universities be required to provide students and faculty with notification about other counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, and legal assistance. 

"This common-sense addition will strengthen the current proposed rules and increase awareness of resources that are already present on campus or in nearby communities," the senators wrote in a letter. "In the tragic event of a sexual assault, it is critical that our students know who they can turn to and where they can go — providing information about access to forensic nurses will help accomplish this important goal."

Sexual assault nurse examiners, also known as forensic nurses, are often among the first people that survivors speak to following a sexual assault, Udall and McCaskill said, and -- in addition to administering rape kits -- they are an important piece in encouraging victims to seek other services. "If readily available and adequately trained, forensic nurses can serve as a critical resource for those seeking justice and starting the healing process," the senators wrote.

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Tensions at Pasadena City College

Tensions continue to grow between faculty members at Pasadena City College and President Mark W. Rocha, The Los Angeles Times reported. Rocha says he is making necessary changes to deal with financial challenges. But faculty members say he doesn't consult with them, resulting in flawed decisions. Faculty members are considering their third vote of no confidence in Rocha.

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Colleges assign adjunct hiring to a third party

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Michigan colleges are assigning the hiring and payment of adjuncts to a third-party company. Administrators say it's a win-win, but adjunct advocates say it's a worrisome trend.

Audio: Religious College Exemptions, Affirmative Action

On the latest edition of "This Week," Inside Higher Ed's news podcast, Shapri D. LoMaglio of the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities and Campus Pride's Shane Windmeyer joined Inside Higher Ed Editor Scott Jaschik and the moderator Casey Green to discuss efforts by religious institutions to seek exemptions from key federal civil rights laws; also, the constitutional scholar Rodney A. Smolla analyzed a federal appeals court's ruling last week upholding the University of Texas at Austin's consideration of race in admissions.

Stream or download the podcast here. And click here to receive an email notification when we air a new edition of This Week.

NCAA Drops Likeness Release From Athlete Agreement

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has dropped a controversial name-and-likeness release from the "student-athlete statement" signed each year by Division I college athletes, USA Today reported.

The release is a central part of the high-profile class action filed by Ed O'Bannon, a former University of California at Los Angeles basketball player, as well as other lawsuits filed against the NCAA regarding the commercialized use of likenesses of college athletes. In 2009, the same year that O'Bannon filed his class action, Ryan Hart, a former starting quarterback at Rutgers University, filed a similar complaint. In May of that year, Sam Keller, a former starting quarterback at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, also filed a class action about the NCAA profiting off athletes' likenesses in a series of video games.

The same day that O'Bannon's lawsuit finally went to trial, the NCAA settled its case with Keller, thus avoiding a trial that was set for March. As part of the settlement, the NCAA agreed to make $20 million available to Division I football and men's basketball players at certain colleges whose teams were in the Electronic Arts video games. A week earlier, EA Sports agreed to pay $40 million in a separate settlement with O'Bannon. O'Bannon and the NCAA are still waiting on a federal judge's ruling in the class action.

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