administrators

Bridgewater State's Ex-President Ends Consulting Deal

Dana Mohler-Faria, the former president of Bridgewater State University, has agreed to end a $100,000 a year consulting contract with the institution, The Boston Globe reported. His decision comes amid criticism of his postretirement pay and preretirement travel. In his last three years as president, he made 29 trips, including four to Cape Verde and two to Belize.

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San Jose State University library attack highlights safety issues

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Many campus libraries are open to those with no affiliation with the colleges and are proud of that tradition -- even as it sometimes raises safety issues.

Groups seek to become quality reviewers of boot camps, online courses and other noncollege offerings

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As boot camps, online courses and other nontraditional academic offerings expand, several organizations angle to play an accreditor-like role in the growing space.

New Jersey Requires 24-Hour Mental Health Help

Mental health professionals must now be available around the clock, either remotely or on campus, to assist New Jersey college students in distress. The New Jersey Senate unanimously passed the new suicide-prevention law this week. "We need to reach these young men and women and tell them they are not alone," Kevin O'Toole, the New Jersey senator who sponsored the legislation, said in a statement. "This legislation will ensure our college students will always have someone to lean on in their darkest hours."

When the legislation was first introduced in July, it included a requirement that colleges publicly list the number of suicides that occur on a campus each year. That component of the bill was widely criticized by mental health experts and was eventually removed.

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U of Missouri Board Responds to AAUP on Click Case

The University of Missouri Board of Curators on Thursday responded to the American Association of University Professors’ planned investigation of the Melissa Click case. Pamela Q. Henrickson, board chair, said in a 10-page letter to AAUP that the termination of Click, the former assistant professor of communication at the Columbia campus who asked for muscle to remove a student journalist and yelled at police during on-campus protests this fall, is fundamentally consistent with AAUP values. That’s despite AAUP’s contention that Click was terminated without an opportunity to appeal to a faculty body, a widely followed standard endorsed by the association.

Henrickson said that AAUP’s statements on such matters don’t establish an absolute right or requirement to such a hearing, and instead focus on matters of academic freedom and tenure. She denied that Click’s case concerns academic freedom or tenure, which she noted the professor did not have. Henrickson also wrote that while the board endorses faculty hearings in midterm dismissal cases, Click’s case was not typical in that existing university procedures failed to address the seriousness of her actions (no one filed a complaint against Click).

“[The board] addressed conduct by Dr. Click that was contrary to those basic expectations and at odds with principles of free expression that animate [AAUP policy],” the letter says. “Indeed, by calling for physical intimidation or violence against a student, Dr. Click engaged in conduct that, if tolerated, would pose a risk to the safety of students and faculty and fundamentally endanger the university’s academic environment.”

Henrickson said the board’s actions do not merit censure by AAUP, in which the investigation could result, but that the body is nonetheless reviewing existing Missouri polices to ensure that it will not have to act on its own in instances of future faculty misconduct. Hans-Joerg Tiede, associate secretary of AAUP’s department of academic freedom, tenure and governance, said the association’s investigation will continue as planned, with the investigating committee possibly responding to the board’s concerns in its report.

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Santa Cruz 'Admits' Thousands Who Didn't Apply

Thousands of high school students in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C., received email from the University of California at Santa Cruz this week congratulating them on being admitted. But The Washington Post noted that these students never applied. The university sent acceptance emails to thousands who were on a list of admissions prospects, not actual applicants.

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Would-Be Iowa Professor Loses Age Bias Suit

For the second time, a jury found that the University of Iowa didn’t discriminate against an applicant for a faculty position in the College of Law because he was too old, The Gazette reported. Donald Dobkin, an administrative law attorney who is now 62, first sued the university for age discrimination after he was denied a faculty position in 2008. The job went to a younger candidate with what Dobkin said were inferior qualifications, but a jury sided against him in 2012. He was denied a new trial and lost an appeal.

Dobkin launched a second suit that same year, based on a failed second attempt at a faculty job in 2010 (the job went to a 40-year-old, less experienced applicant, according to the most recent suit). Dobkin alleged discrimination based on age and employment, as well as retaliation for the first suit, but a jury sided against him this week. The university said in a statement that it was “pleased with the jury ruling and the recognition that the law school did not discriminate and did not retaliate.” Dobkin could not immediately be reached for comment, according to The Gazette.

New presidents or provosts: Cazenovia Chamberlain Cuyahoga Maine-Fort Kent National SMU UT-Austin

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  • David W. Andrews, dean and professor of Johns Hopkins University School of Education, in Maryland, has been named president of National University, in California.
  • Ronald Chesbrough, president of St. Charles Community College, in Missouri, has been selected as president of Cazenovia College, in New York.

Former Professor Awarded $1M for Threats About Suit

A former professor of architecture at Catholic University won $1 million in damages this week after a jury found that the institution attempted to scare her out of suing it for discrimination, The Washington Post reported. After a four-week trial, a jury in D.C. Superior Court rejected Rauzia Ruhana Ally’s claim that she was fired because she is a Muslim Indian woman, but determined that administrators engaged in an email campaign to get her to drop a wrongful termination lawsuit.

Ally was fired in 2012, a year after taking on a job as director of a university project, according to the post. The university said she was insubordinate and failed to keep project costs down, but Ally alleged discrimination. Ally’s attorney during the trial presented emails from Randall W. Ott, dean of Catholic’s School of Architecture, accusing the former professor and her husband of stealing a desk-size model home and discussing a plan to press charges. Ally said she never removed the model, and charges were never brought, but Ott in an email to another administrator referred to the proposed charges as a “threat.”

Elise Italiano, university spokesperson, told the Post that in “both policy and practice, the university is committed to fair and equal treatment of every employee. We have respect for every employee and a rich compliance and ethics program.” She denied that Ott’s emails were malicious but said the university was reviewing standards about how managers communicate.

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Study: Students Know Little About Consumer Credit

Nearly 60 percent of California college students interviewed for a recent survey could not define the term "credit score." The survey, released Tuesday by student loan website LendEDU, included responses from 668 students at both two-year and four-year institutions. More than 40 percent of students said they did not believe that student loan debt was included in a credit report or score.

A separate study released earlier this year by the Council of Economic Education found that only 17 states require high school students to take a course in personal finance.

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