Transition at Higher Ed Search Firm

One of the major higher education search firms, AGB Search, on Wednesday announced a change in leadership. Thomas B. Courtice will be the next managing principal. Courtice, former president of Ohio Wesleyan University, has served as associate managing principal. He succeeds James P. Ferrare, the founding managing principal, who has led AGB Search since it was founded in 2010.


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Quinnipiac president criticized after showing up at loud student party

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Quinnipiac's leader shows up at a loud off-campus student party, to the delight of attendees. When video of the event circulates, his comments infuriate local leaders.


Florida Closes Fraternity Accused of Insulting Veterans

The University of Florida closed its chapter of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity Tuesday over allegations that members insulted and spat on disabled veterans during a spring formal earlier this month at Panama City Beach. The veterans were at the same resort for an annual event called the Warrior Beach Retreat when the fraternity members allegedly began accosting them. Members of Emory University's Zeta Beta Tau chapter were also accused of the behavior, but Emory has not yet punished the fraternity, due to a lack of evidence, the university said. Emory is still investigating the allegations.

"I continue to be saddened and disappointed by the reported mistreatment and disrespect of our military veterans," Kent Fuchs, Florida's president, said in a statement. "Our university has always honored, and will always honor, the service of veterans. The reported conduct of this fraternity contradicts the values of service and respect that are at the center of this university."

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'American Sniper' Will Be Screened at U of Maryland

After a student organization at the University of Maryland at College Park called off a screening of the film American Sniper, two other student groups have decided to show the movie instead. The College Republicans and College Democrats at Maryland announced Tuesday that they will screen American Sniper on Monday and moderate a panel discussion following the film.

American Sniper was originally scheduled to be shown at a screening organized by Maryland's Student Entertainment Events, a student group that arranges for films, comedians and musicians to come to campus. After receiving a petition from the university's Muslim Student Association and meeting with concerned students -- who argued that the film fuels "anti-Arab and anti-Islamic sentiments" and "helps to proliferate the marginalization of multiple groups and communities" -- the group decided to put off the screening until at least next semester. The decision prompted widespread outrage and media coverage as several other colleges have faced similar protests over screenings of the film.

In a statement Tuesday, Wallace Loh, Maryland's president, praised the College Republicans and College Democrats for organizing the new screening, but condemned the "venomous, racist and hateful messages" directed at the Muslim Student Association over the last week. He also criticized Maryland politicians and national news organizations that continue to mischaracterize the decision as being made by the university, not a student group.

"MSA members were right to speak up for what they believe in," Loh said. "They deserve our admiration, not the scorn and vitriol they got on Facebook. I also applaud the student leaders of SEE for listening to the concerns of their fellow students. Their decision to reschedule the screening so a constructive dialogue could be held marks the exercise of free speech and a sensitivity to campus values of respect and inclusion. I am proud of our College Republicans and College Democrats for working together on the screening and panel discussion of American Sniper. Working together, despite differences in philosophy and doctrine, is a laudable example for us all."

Parents Are Saving Less for College

Parents who are saving money for their children to attend college said they are earmarking 10 percent of their total savings for that purpose, according to a new report from Sallie Mae, the student lender. But the average amount parents said they have set aside for college has declined by 25 percent since last year, to $10,040 from $13,408.

"Parents are allocating approximately 10 percent of their total savings for their children’s college, a rate that has remained stable over the past three years," said the report. "However, since savings overall are down, the dollar amounts being saved for college are also lower."

This is the fifth installment of Sallie Mae's college saving study, which it first released in 2008. The report found that 4 in 10 of the surveyed parents said they were confident they could pay for the future price of college.

Stockton President Quits Abruptly

The president of Stockton University abruptly resigned Tuesday, citing medical reasons for his early departure. 

Herman Saatkamp's departure comes four months earlier than he originally told the university he would be leaving. “It saddens me to have to leave this abruptly,” Saatkamp said in a university news release. 

The resignation also comes a week after a faculty vote in which one-third wanted to call for his resignation and 80 percent supported "some level of condemnation" against the leader, according to a article. University stakeholders and New Jersey legislators are upset by Saatkamp's decision to purchase a hotel and casino for $18 million to use as a new Atlantic City campus and lodging for the school, despite restrictions that the building must be run as a casino hotel. The casino's parent corporation filed for bankruptcy shortly after the purchase.

Stockton's provost, Harvey Kesselman, will serve as acting president.

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Colleges and the Education Department scramble to help former Corinthian students amid largest college shutdown

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Education Department and community colleges try to help Corinthian students transfer, but Senate Democrats and consumer groups complain about for-profits as a transfer option.

Latinos in Higher Education

California's 15 million Latinos have made strides in their educational attainment in recent decades, but deep achievement gaps persist, according to a new report from the Campaign for College Opportunity, an advocacy group. For example, only 12 percent of working-age Latinos in the state hold a bachelor's degree, the report found, compared to 42 percent of non-Hispanic white Californians. Latinos are underrepresented across all three of the state's higher education systems. And the report found that roughly two-thirds of those students attend community colleges, where only 39 percent earn a degree or certificate or transfer within six years.

Another recently released report found that, nationwide, more Latinos are earning credentials in health professions. The study, from Excelencia in Education, a nonprofit advocacy group, found that Latinos who graduated with credentials in health professions in 2013 were highly concentrated in certificate and associate-degree programs for some of the fastest-growing occupations in the nation. But those jobs are typically in support roles, such as personal care aides and home health aides. And those jobs tend to pay less than ones in practitioner roles, such as dentists, physicians and surgeons.

“Health care support jobs pay about a quarter as much as health care practitioners, so this is a very real disparity," Deborah Santiago, Excelencia in Education’s chief operating officer and vice president for policy, who co-authored the report, said in a written statement.

New presidents or provosts: Granite Frederick Hanover Hood Lees-McRae Lone Star Memphis St. Leo TAMU

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  • Andrea E. Chapdelaine, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Albright College, in Pennsylvania, has been appointed president of Hood College, in Maryland.

Visiting assistant professorships get a bad rap. One college says it does them better.

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If visiting assistant professorships get a bad rap, one college says it does them better.


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