administrators

Altercation at U of Iowa Not a Hate Crime, Police Say

Local police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have ruled that an altercation involving a black University of Iowa student last month was not a hate crime.

The Iowa student told police that he was walking in an alley in downtown Iowa City on April 30 when three men began punching him and yelling racial slurs. Iowa students criticized the university for failing to notify the campus of the attack until days later. Iowa officials said they did not learn of the Saturday incident until that Tuesday, when they were contacted by a television news station in Chicago, where the student’s family lives.

Iowa City police said this week that, after reviewing surveillance footage and interviewing witnesses, the altercation was revealed to be an "isolated incident that stemmed from an ongoing disagreement" between two fraternities. According to police, the student, Marcus Owens, was involved in three separate fights that night related to the disagreement.

"According to witnesses, the N-word was used by one individual at the time of the second altercation," police said in a statement. "This investigation was referred to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for review to assist in making the determination if this matter was defined as a hate crime. The FBI determined that the facts of this investigation did not meet the criteria necessary to be labeled as a hate crime."

In a statement released Tuesday, the family of Owens apologized to the university and the police department.

"Upon learning more details of the case, and while racial slurs served to fuel the violence, Marcus now knows that his account of events was inconsistent with police findings, in part due to alcohol being involved, his embarrassment at his behavior, as well as the injuries he sustained," the family said. "In light of this, it was concluded that this incident was not a hate crime as originally believed, but rather a case of excessive underage drinking and extremely poor judgment on the part of many people, Marcus included."

University of Iowa officials also released a statement, saying that "regardless of the outcome, this incident highlighted a level of fear and distrust on our campus that must and will be addressed."

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Several Ex-Athletes Sue NCAA Over Head Injuries

Several former college football players from six institutions filed class action lawsuits on Tuesday alleging that their universities, athletic conferences and the National Collegiate Athletic Association were negligent in their handling of the players' head injuries. The athletes who filed the lawsuits all played college football prior to 2010, when the NCAA began requiring its members to have concussion protocols. The lawsuits were filed by former football players for Auburn, Pennsylvania State and Vanderbilt Universities and the Universities of Georgia, Oregon and Utah.

The NCAA was first sued over concussions in 2011. That lawsuit was then joined by several others, becoming a class action. Earlier this year, a judge approved a settlement in the case that includes the NCAA creating new safety protocols and providing $70 million for medical screenings for former college athletes. That settlement included no payments for players already suffering from head injuries, however.

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U of Delaware trustees vote to change faculty roles and responsibilities

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University of Delaware gives the provost more control over the Faculty Senate, and says that professors will now advise on some areas they had previously controlled.

How to keep emotions from leading your communications (essay)

The last time you experienced a communication problem may have been because you were too upset to properly convey your message, writes Elizabeth Suárez.

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Amherst president discusses college's welcoming environment for low-income students

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Amherst College's president talks about adding more community college transfers after receiving an award for supporting low-income students.

When students pay tuition to work unpaid internships

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New twist in the debate over unpaid internships is whether colleges should charge tuition for them.

New presidents or provosts: Canberra Cumberland Morris New Paltz Rollins Stockton UND UNO Western Wheelock

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  • Lorin Basden Arnold, dean of the College of Communication and Creative Arts at Rowan University, in New Jersey, has been appointed provost and vice president for academic affairs at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

More Money for Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State

San Francisco State University has reached an agreement with its embattled College of Ethnic Studies. The college, the only one of its kind in the country, has said it is chronically underfunded, to the point that it can barely sustain operations beyond paying full-time personnel. Facing student protests, President Les Wong said the college was overspending.

The agreement, reached late last week between the university and student hunger strikers, says that central administration will make an additional $482,806 investment in the college, in addition to an earlier $250,000 additional commitment for next academic year. That’s upward of the approximately $500,000 faculty members at the college estimated they needed to close their budget gap earlier this year. The investment includes support for two full-time, tenure-track faculty lines in Africana studies, four work-study positions and the development of a Pacific Islander studies program. The agreement also provides for more regular communication between the college and the university about funding and other needs. All parties have agreed to a silent period through the end of the year.

To train future ed-tech leaders, higher ed needs new discipline, some say

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Conference at Georgetown U discusses how to train future ed-tech leaders and whether creating a new discipline is the answer.

Hobart President's Band Celebrates End of Year

At Hobart and William Smith Colleges, the end of the semester is marked by performances of the President’s Garage Band, including President Mark D. Gearan (keyboard) and many faculty and staff members, including Bill Waller, an economics professor (trumpet); Mark Deutschlander, a biology professor (guitar); Rob Carson, an English professor (guitar); and many others. Below, the band performing "Sweet Caroline" last week.

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