administrators

President, Husband Give $4M to Gustavus Adolphus

Many presidents try to build support for new strategic plans. But Rebecca Bergman, president of Gustavus Adolphus, has gone farther than most -- Bergman and her husband have pledged $4 million to the college to help carry out various parts of the plan. Details of the gift may be found here.

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NCAA Sanctions Southern for Lack of Institutional Control

Southern University "lacked institutional control when it failed to monitor its eligibility certification process, did not properly apply financial aid rules and did not comply with academic performance penalties," the National Collegiate Athletic Association announced Wednesday.

The association said that several errors occurred when the university attempted to transfer its academic records from an "outdated system to a new system," and that the athletic department did a poor job of record keeping. The mistakes led to 218 athletes across all of the university's sport programs being improperly certified. The university had also previously been placed on probation for not meeting the NCAA's academic performance benchmarks, a sanction that required the university to reduce its amount of in-season playing and practice times. "Because of turnover at the university, especially in the compliance office, the university did not communicate the restrictions to the coaches, and the penalties were not completed," the NCAA stated.

Southern University also exceeded scholarship limits in five sports when it failed to properly apply financial aid rules to tuition waivers provided by the state of Louisiana to college athletes.

The NCAA placed the university on probation for five years and will vacate records of games in which athletes participated while ineligible. The NCAA also accepted the university’s self-imposed penalties of a $5,000 fine and scholarship reductions across several programs, including women's soccer, softball, baseball, men's and women's basketball, and football.

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Gingrich Backs For-Profit Group's Campaign

Newt Gingrich and U.S. Representative Pete Sessions, a Texas Republican, are slated to join Career Education Colleges and Universities at an event Friday. The group, which is the primary trade organization for the for-profit sector, is announcing a new campaign to close the skills gap with five million trained professionals. Gingrich, the former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and a prominent adviser to President-elect Donald Trump, in August appeared in a web video with Steve Gunderson, the for-profit group's president and CEO.

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Student walkouts, anti-Trump protester assaulted, second student implicated in racist emails and more

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Stanford students walk out of classes; Tulsa CC student implicated in racist emails to Penn students; blackface controversy at Abilene Christian; and more.

College Completers More Likely to Be Employed

New federal numbers show that students who complete a college degree or certificate are more likely to be employed than their peers who don't. The data from the U.S. Department of Education is based on a study of 16,700 students who first enrolled in college in 2003. Those who had earned a credential by 2009 were more likely to hold employment at that time. Students who earned a degree were more likely to be employed than those who earned a certificate.

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NCAA: Black Male Basketball Players Graduate at All-Time High

High graduation rates for African-American men's basketball players are "fueling an all-time high graduation success rate for Division I college athletes," the National Collegiate Athletic Association announced Tuesday. Over all, according to the NCAA, 80 percent of Division I men's basketball players graduated within six years, including 77 percent of black players -- a three percentage point increase from last year. The graduation success rate for all Division I athletes was 86 percent.

“This is a hugely significant and extremely important moment,” Mark Emmert, the NCAA's president, said. “Over the last 15 years, the overall graduation success rate has dramatically improved, but the really good news is how college sports helps more and more minority students, especially those playing our highest-profile sport, earn a degree that will help them long after their athletics career is over.”

The NCAA's metric for measuring graduation, the graduation success rate, has its critics, however, as it excludes players who have transferred. Other studies on Division I athlete graduation rates, in particular black athletes in revenue sports like men's basketball and football, have found lower graduation rates.

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NCAA: Thomas More Violated Rules When Player Lived With Coach

The women's basketball team at Thomas More College, a Division III institution in Kentucky, will be stripped of its national championship title because a star player lived with a former assistant coach while recovering from a knee injury. The National Collegiate Athletic Association on Tuesday announced that the college violated NCAA rules by allowing the athlete, Sydney Moss, to stay with the assistant coach, Jerry Allen, who was a volunteer with the program at the time, but also a longtime family friend.

"Sydney had a real tough upbringing," David Armstrong, the college's president, said during a media conference Tuesday. "She has had a tough upbringing and Jerry Allen and his family, also a biracial couple, were her friends since seventh grade. So when she injured her knee, she stayed with them."

Armstrong said the living arrangement was an unintentional mistake. In its infractions report, the NCAA acknowledged that Moss and Allen had long treated each other like family, but said that such a relationship does not exclude them from NCAA rules. The association said that the misunderstanding "stemmed from the college's failure to provide adequate rules education." Thomas More College must vacate all wins from the team's undefeated 2014-15 season in which Moss participated, agree to an outside audit of the college' athletics program, pay a $2,500 fine and remain on probation for two years, the NCAA stated.

Several staff members, including the head women's basketball coach, must also attend a regional rules seminar organized by the NCAA.

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What's the future of federal push on higher education 'innovation'?

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Amid uncertainty over new administration’s stance on postsecondary education, Under Secretary Ted Mitchell exhorts colleges and other supporters of expanding postsecondary opportunity to “double down” on their work.

Some Brown U Students Removed, Threw Out Flags

Some students at Brown University removed and trashed U.S. flags that were set up last week for a Veterans Day ceremony, The Washington Post reported. The incident has set off a debate at Brown about the flag and about appropriate and inappropriate ways of showing dissent from U.S. policy and the election last week of Donald Trump as president. In this case, the issue is not just the way the flag was treated, but the vandalism of a display of flags set up by the university. A statement from the university said, "We do not condone the activities that led to the flags being removed, and destruction of property is subject to disciplinary review."

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Columbia Suspends Wrestling While Offensive Posts Investigated

Columbia University has suspended wrestling competition while the university investigates offensive posts that team members have apparently shared for years, The New York Times reported. Last week, when the posts were first revealed, the university said its team would skip a weekend competition. Now, the team will skip all competitions until the investigation is complete. The posts included racist, sexist and homophobic comments.

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