administrators

City U. of New York Names U. of Nebraska Leader as New Chancellor

The City University of New York on Wednesday named James B. Milliken, president of the University of Nebraska system, as its next chancellor. Milliken heads the four-campus Nebraska system, which, despite counting a Big Ten research university among its members, has a largely open-access mission, as does CUNY. He previously was a senior administrator at the University of North Carolina system.

Milliken replaces the interim chancellor William P. Kelly, who took that role after Matthew Goldstein retired after 14 years in CUNY's top job.

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Division II likely to raise academic standards for athletes

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Division II institutions are poised to raise academic standards for athletes, with a series of rules similar to those passed by Division I two years ago.

Michigan Will Review Procedures for Terrible Weather

Last week, campuses throughout the Midwest shut down due to dangerously cold weather, but the University of Michigan remained open -- to the frustration of many of its employees and students. Now the university says it is reviewing its procedures for closing during bad weather, MLive.com reported. Provost Martha Pollack told a faculty committee that one reason the university didn't close last week was the lack of procedures to do so. "We didn't have the appropriate mechanisms, even if we wanted to close the university," she said. "That said, after this was all over, I and some of the other executive officers really strongly believe that we ... need to revisit this policy." The university last closed for weather-related reasons in 1978.

 

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West Virginia Chemical Spill and Colleges

A “Do Not Drink” ban was put in place Thursday after a chemical spill contaminated a West Virginia river, leaving 300,000 people -- and several campuses -- without safe tap water. The University of Charleston's spring semester was scheduled to start on Jan. 13, but university officials were asked to instead open campus on Jan. 16. Students who live on campus were sent to a residence hall on a new campus in Beckley, W.V., an hour south of Charleston. On Friday, a quick count showed that at least 60 students had been displaced, but that number rapidly increased to more than 150 over the weekend. Those students can return this evening.

Another school that has had to delay its spring semester is Marshall University’s South Charleston campus. It had to close although the main Marshall campus was not affected.

West Virginia State University also closed and classes will begin Jan. 21.

Alleged Plagiarism by Chicago State's Interim Provost

The University of Illinois at Chicago is investigating allegations that Angela Henderson, currently interim provost of Chicago State University, plagiarized her nursing Ph.D. dissertation, The Chicago Tribune reported. The Tribune had three experts on academic integrity review the dissertation and sources on which it drew. "The experts said Henderson had errors in attribution that violate the UIC College of Nursing's policy on academic integrity included in the student handbook," the newspaper reported. "In her dissertation, Henderson at times uses verbatim or near-verbatim language from other sources without using quotation marks to tell the reader that it is identical. Her citations include the author and year of publication but not the exact reference or page number as required by UIC's policy."

Tricia Bertram Gallant, editor of the book Creating the Ethical Academy: A Systems Approach to Understanding Misconduct & Empowering Change in Higher Education, said, "These are repeated issues. It is not sloppiness here or there, or plagiarism here or there, it is quite often."

The Tribune also noted that a member of Henderson's dissertation committee was Wayne Watson, president at Chicago State, with whom Henderson previously worked. Henderson's husband is Watson's personal lawyer.

Henderson declined to comment.

 

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UCLA produces statement designed to protect faculty from inappropriate open records requests

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Following recent open records requests targeting controversial professors at other institutions, UCLA releases statement to protect the privacy of scholarly communications.

Berkeley Appoints Stanford's Claude Steele as Provost

The University of California at Berkeley's chancellor has appointed Claude L. Steele, the I. James Quillen Dean of Stanford University's education school, as the flagship public's executive vice chancellor and provost. With the appointment by Chancellor Nicholas Dirks, which awaits the formal approval of the University of California's regents, Steele will once again be a major university's top academic officer.

He served as provost of Columbia University from 2009-11 before returning as education dean to Stanford. where he had built his career as a social psychologist best known for his theory of "stereotype threat." Dirks worked with Steele at Columbia, where he was executive vice president and dean of the college of arts and sciences.

"Claude is a world-class scholar, an extraordinarily gifted administrator, and a visionary leader with a deep commitment to teaching, innovation and collaboration," Dirks said. "He is uniquely qualified to help sustain and expand our public mission and ethos, maintain our academic excellence and access and advance on our commitment to diversity in every sense of the word. We look forward to welcoming him to Berkeley."

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Penn State's Credit Card Royalties

Pennsylvania State University earned more ($2.7 million) on credit card royalties and fees than did any other college or university, according to an analysis by The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The newspaper used reports required by a new federal law. But the analysis also found that the number of accounts on which Penn State is paid is going down -- from 65,955 in December 2011 to 60,490 in December 2012.

Cooper Union trustees reject last-ditch plan to keep college free

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Cooper Union trustees reject a plan to keep the college free. Alumni fear impact of the shift to tuition.

Administrator Who Ran Phone Sex Line Won't Be Fired

The University of Colorado at Denver does not plan to seek the dismissal of an administrator who was placed on leave after the revelation that she was running a phone sex service, CBS Denver 4 reported. The TV network has also found that she ran an escort service. The administrator -- Resa Cooper-Morning, cultural diversity coordinator in the university's ethnic studies department -- has declined to comment, and her lawyer has denied any wrongdoing.

A spokesman for the university said: "We’ve been unable to establish that Ms. Cooper-Morning engaged in criminal activity nor have we been able to determine that she operated her outside businesses while on the job. The university does not condone Ms. Cooper-Morning's activities, but under the law, there are limits on actions that employers can take regarding off-duty conduct of employees. In the absence of additional information, Ms. Cooper-Morning remains employed by the university."

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