administrators

Nebraska AAUP Leader Says She Can't Defend Grad Student

A faculty member at the University of Nebraska at Omaha resigned last week as president of the state conference of the American Association of University Professors, saying she couldn’t defend a graduate student and former lecturer, the Omaha World-Herald reported. Courtney Lawton, a graduate student in English at the Lincoln campus, was removed from the classroom as a lecturer last semester after she was recorded protesting an on-campus recruiting table for Turning Point USA, the conservative group behind Professor Watchlist. The incident, in which Lawton made an obscene gesture to an undergraduate, led state Republican legislators to question campus climates and criticize Lincoln’s English department, in particular.

The AAUP has largely defended Lawton’s right to due process and academic freedom until now. But Donna Dufner, an associate professor of information systems and quantitative analysis at Omaha who took over as state conference president on Jan. 1, said she could not support the graduate student. “I couldn’t represent the AAUP in the Lawton case because I kept coming down on the side of the administration,” she told the World-Herald. AAUP’s national office is currently investigating the situation at Lincoln for alleged violations of academic freedom.

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

U Toronto Publishes '10,000 Ph.D.s Project'

Roughly one-third of Ph.D.s who graduated from the University of Toronto between 2000 and 2015 hold tenure-track or tenured positions in academe, according to a major study of outcomes by the institution’s School of Graduate Studies. Sixty percent of graduates over all work in academe. The share of Ph.D.s working in business is increasing: some 13 percent of 2000 graduates ended up in the private sector, compared to 23 percent of graduates in 2015. Researchers were able to obtain employment information for 88 percent of nearly 10,000 Ph.D.s using open-access data sources, such as official university and company websites. More data are available here.

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

3 Million Americans Live in Higher Education Deserts

Roughly three million Americans live more than 25 miles from a broad-access public college and do not have the sort of high-speed internet connection necessary for online college programs, according to a new report from the Urban Institute's education policy program.

The institute used data from the U.S. Department of Education and the Federal Communications Commission to identify these education "deserts," cross-referencing that information with data from the Census Bureau to determine who lives in them. The report found that 17.6 million adults live in a physical higher education desert, with 3.1 million (1.3 percent of adults in the U.S.) lacking access to online and physical college programs.

The report also tracked the demographics of people who live in education deserts.Bar chart: Share of adults living in each type of education desert, by race or ethnicity. Chart breaks down whether adults live in a complete education desert, physical education desert, online education desert, or no education desert. For Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islanders, more than 80 percent were not in an education desert, and the largest percentage were in a physical education desert. For Asians, more than 90 percent were not in an education desert, and the largest percentage were in a physical education desert. For American Indians or Alaska Natives, more than 60 percent were not in an education desert. About 5 percent were in an online education desert, about 20 percent were in a physical education desert and about 12 percent were in a complete education desert. For Hispanics, about 85 percent were not in an education desert, and the largest percentage were in a physical education desert, with about 3 percent in a complete education desert. For black respondents, about 88 percent were not in an education desert, and the largest percentage were in a physical education desert, with about 3 percent in a complete education desert. For white respondents, about 80 percent were not in an education desert, and the largest percentage were in a physical education desert, with about 4 percent in a complete education desert.

"This study demonstrates what many Native Americans, rural Americans and other Americans living in education deserts already know: the internet has not untethered all of us from our geographic locations," said the report. "As long as broadband access depends on geography, place still plays an important role in access to higher education."Map of the United States is color coded to show areas that are not education deserts, physical education deserts, online education deserts, and complete education deserts, with large swaths of Wyoming, North and South Dakota, Maine, Nevada, Texas, and Utah designated physical education deserts.

Ad keywords: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Maine Suspends Professor Over 'Concerns'

The University of Maine put a professor of theater on paid administrative leave over what it called students’ “confidential concerns,” the Bangor Daily News reported. Margaret Nagle, university spokesperson, told the newspaper that Maine received a number of emails from students containing allegations about the professor, Tom Mikotowicz, and that he was placed on leave in December. Nagle said an investigation is ongoing and no determinations have been made about the professor’s actions. She provided no further details, citing the privacy rights of both students and professors. Mikotowicz did not respond to requests for comment. One of his classes was reportedly canceled and two others were reassigned to other professors.

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Broward College faces criticism over faculty art piece made of American flag

Broward College art professor draws controversy with a piece made of an American flag, resembling a floor mat. 

Adrian College Professor Accused of Abuse Resigns

A longtime professor of music at Adrian College accused of sexual abuse decades ago has resigned for “personal reasons,” according to the institution. The professor, Thomas Hodgman, began working at Adrian in 1999. Prior to that, he was accused of abusing two students at Mater Dei High School in Santa Ana, Calif. Documents related to the abuse cases surfaced in 2005, but Hodgman remained on Adrian’s faculty, The Blade reported. 

One of Hodgman’s accusers sued the Diocese of Orange County, Calif., and she received $1.6 million in 2005 as part of a $100 million settlement split among dozens of victims. Some of the documents from that case were published online and in the Orange County Register. Hodgman at the time challenged the papers’ authenticity and Adrian called him an “exemplary faculty member,” according to The Blade. The Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests is calling for an investigation into the circumstances of his recent departure. Hodgman could not be reached for comment, and Adrian indicated it will say no more about the case.

Ad keywords: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Iowa Removes Wynn Name From Institute

The University of Iowa announced Wednesday that it is removing the name of Stephen Wynn, the casino mogul with prominent Republican Party ties, from a vision institute. “The University of Iowa is committed to ending sexual violence and sexual misconduct and ensuring survivors know they are believed, supported, and assisted. It is incongruous with the university’s values to maintain the Wynn name on our program and building,” said a statement from President Bruce Harreld.

In 2013, Wynn pledged $25 million to the Institute for Vision Research, and he has given $20 million of that pledge. While the institute was named for him after the pledge, the university statement said that "the naming was in recognition of the gift, and not a condition of the gift."

In January, The Wall Street Journal reported on numerous allegations of sexual misconduct by Wynn. He has denied the charges.

Ad keywords: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Technology tools at work in literature classrooms

Contrary to reputation, literature classrooms are full of technology possibilities.

High-impact practices enliven staid online course format

Instructors are turning to high-impact practices that have proved effective in the classroom to make online course experiences more dynamic.

Scholars Defend Stanford Professor Receiving Threats

Nearly 600 supporters of David Palumbo-Liu, the Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor and professor of comparative literature at Stanford University, have signed an open letter asking his institution to “enunciate a strict code of ethics for journalists, distinguishing between opinion pieces and news reporting.” The letter was prompted by a recent article in an independent student newspaper, The Stanford Review, about Palumbo-Liu’s affiliation with the Campus Antifascist Network, calling it “undeniably a chapter of a terrorist group” that embraces “vigilante thuggery.” Fox News picked up the piece, as did several right-wing websites, and Palumbo-Liu says he’s since received graphic death threats and other hate mail from across the country.

The Campus Antifascist Network was formed in part to organize protests against racist demonstrations on college campuses. And while some members of the international “antifa” movement embrace violence as a protest tool, Palumbo-Liu told the Review that the network does not. The open letter says, in part, that “The Review provides no evidence whatsoever for their claim that Palumbo-Liu is a member of a terrorist organization. Such reckless and inflammatory statements violate not only journalistic standards but also Stanford's Fundamental Standard, and they ultimately endanger all of us.” The Review responded to criticism from Palumbo-Liu in a follow-up piece called “If It Quacks Like a Duck …” A spokesperson for Stanford said a review is under way and that the institution is “closely monitoring the situation.”

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - administrators
Back to Top