administrators

Essay by provost reflects on advice he gave to new provosts

Jim Hunt looks back at some advice he had for fellow provosts.

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Partner benefits in higher ed evolve as more states recognize gay marriage

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As more states recognize gay marriage, universities consider whether to keep policies created to help same-sex partners who couldn't marry. And in states that still don't recognize gay marriage, some public colleges are starting to offer new benefits.

 

Court Upholds and Limits U. of Wisconsin Injunction

The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the University of Wisconsin System had valid reasons to obtain an injunction against a former student who repeatedly disrupted meetings and events, the Associated Press reported. The disruptions went beyond protest, and thus were legitimate to ban, the ruling said. The former student argues that he was engaged in protest over the way the university system campuses use student fees. The court, however, also found that the injunction -- barring the former student from all campuses and interacting with all university employees -- was too broad, and so ordered a lower court to narrow it.

 

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ACE Studies on Faculty Roles and Business Models

The American Council on Education on Wednesday released two reports from its Presidential Innovation Lab. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation-funded lab asks more than a dozen chief executives to think about how technological, pedagogical, organizational and structural innovations can close the student achievement gap.

The first paper, called "Unbundling Versus Designing Faculty Roles," traces the evolving role of the faculty, from mainly tutors in the 18 and 19th centuries, to the increasingly professionalized faculty of the early and mid-20th century, to contemporary professors, for whom teaching, research, service and others duties increasingly are “unbundled” or disaggregated. The paper argues that this unbundling is particularly acute in large introductory courses, where instructors mainly teach rather than design courses, and in massive, open, online courses, or MOOCs. At the same time, the paper says, unbundling is occurring in myriad ways, and “there is no single model.”

A common concern related to such unbundling, the paper says, is the potential for the decline of the “complete scholar,” whose research, teaching and service combine to positively impact students. But, the paper notes, community college teachers understandably may focus more on teaching than research. The paper also says that technology can help integrate teaching and research by making teaching more inquiry-driven, and by making teaching a kind of research process through student data analytics. The paper concludes that unbundling of professor duties is not necessarily bad for students, but that it requires further study. Colleges and universities may do well to study unbundling within their institutions and more intentionally assign faculty roles based on their evolving duties, as some institutions have done. But those conversations also should happen at the national level, the paper says.

The second paper, called "Beyond the Inflection Point: Reimagining Business Models for Higher Education," raises a broad range of questions about possible changes to higher education’s various business models. For example, the 10-page primer mentions the role of online education in potentially depressing tuition prices across the academy. It also looks at how competency-based education and prior-learning assessment could increase the acceptance of alternative credentialing in higher education. The context for these changes includes more scrutiny of costs in higher education and of the use of cross-subsidization among programs. While the paper doesn't provide firm answers to these challenges, it makes several suggestions, including a call for more collaboration between colleges and for institutions to consider outsourcing the teaching of introductory courses.

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New presidents or provosts: Suffolk Tuskegee UNCG Vanderbilt WCCC WSU

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  • Daniel J. Bernardo, interim provost and executive vice president at Washington State University, has been named to the job on a permanent basis.
  • Jack P. Calareso, president of Anna Maria College, in Massachusetts, has been chosen as president of St. Joseph's College, in New York.

Adjuncts Urge Labor Dept. Inquiry Into Working Conditions

More than 500 adjunct professors and their advocates have signed a petition calling for the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate their working conditions. The petition's authors, all current or former adjuncts at various colleges and universities, allege that they are being paid for only part of the work they do, and that that amounts to wage theft. The petition is addressed to David Weil, director of the agency's Wage and Hour Division, and urges him to "open an investigation into the labor practices of our colleges and universities in the employment of contingent faculty, including adjunct instructors and full-time contract faculty outside the tenure track." The investigation should be conducted at the "sector" level, they say, rather than individually.

The petition says that average yearly income for adjunct professors "hovers in the same range as minimum-wage fast food and retail workers," since adjuncts typically are paid only for the time they spend teaching -- not the time they spend preparing or meeting individually with students. Ann Kottner, an adjunct professor of English at three New York City-area colleges, says in a photo posted with the petition that she works 66 hours per week but is compensated for only 26 hours, for example. Kottner and her co-authors say faculty unions have helped alleviate the problem in some cases, but that more needs to be done to protect the rights of adjuncts who can't or won't form unions. Many adjuncts lack basic job security and fear getting "blacklisted" for speaking out or organizing, they say.

The Labor Department did not return a call for comment on the petition.

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Scrutiny of Hobart's Handling of Sex Assault Case

A prominent article in The New York Times offers a highly critical look at how Hobart and William Smith Colleges handled a student's complaint that she was sexually assaulted by three football players. The article describes how the college quickly cleared the players -- and physical evidence that emerged backing the female student's complaints. The article also describes how the student felt her privacy was violated, and how she was subject to threats and harassment for having brought the charges.

Hobart on Sunday issued a statement disputing many points in the article. The statement said, for example, that while the article portrayed the case as one in which local authorities were not contacted initially, the local police were contacted within one hour of the report received by the college. The statement says that the college takes sexual assault cases seriously, and that in the past two years, Hobart has adjudicated seven charges of sexual misconduct, four of which led to students being "permanently separated" from Hobart.

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Should Presidents Pay Taxes on Their Houses?

A recent Internal Revenue Service audit of Ohio University has determined that President Roderick Davis should pay personal income taxes on the benefit of living in the presidential home, The Columbus Dispatch reported. The university's board responded by giving Davis extra funds to pay the taxes. But the article noted that other Ohio colleges and university presidents who live in presidential homes don't pay taxes on the benefit.

 

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AFT and Freelancers Union announce new effort to help adjuncts with insurance

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AFT and Freelancers Union announce plan to give those off the tenure track the ability to buy insurance through groups, rather than individually.

Favorites for Texas Chancellorship Are Non-Academics

Both The Texas Monthly and The Dallas Morning News are reporting that two candidates have emerged as favorites as the University of Texas System Board of Regents seeks a system chancellor to succeed Francisco Cigarroa, who plans to return to academic medicine. The two candidates are Richard W. Fisher, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and Admiral William McRaven. The Morning News article said other candidates were still being considered.

If the job goes to Fisher or McRaven, that would continue a trend in recent years of higher ed system head positions in Texas going to people with experience primarily outside of academe.

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