administrators

OCR: Colleges Must Support Pregnant and Parenting Students

Colleges have special responsibilities to support young parents and pregnant students under Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights said in a “Dear Colleague” letter Tuesday. The letter is an update and expansion of previous guidance issued on the topic in 1991. The letter cites studies saying that only 2 percent of women who had a child before the age of 18 earned a degree by 30, and notes that Title IX prohibits discrimination of these students in any educational program, including extracurricular activities. OCR sent the letter -- along with a pamphlet of guidelines, strategies and best practices to support pregnant and parenting -- to all colleges.

Essay on why colleges need to rally behind the Senate immigration bill

Over the past few years, partisanship in Washington has grown to the point that few substantive bills become law. The partisan divide at times seems insurmountable. Immigration reform has a chance to be a rare bipartisan exception.

Our nation has long prided itself on being a land of opportunity for those seeking a better life. With time, however, our immigration system has broken down. The system neither fairly serves those who want to come here nor maximizes the economic opportunities that immigrants can provide for this nation.

Recognizing this, Congress may finally act.  While the U.S. House of Representatives is still developing legislation, immigration reform is steadily moving forward in the Senate where a bipartisan "Gang of Eight" drafted a strong bill that is serving as the legislative foundation. The Senate is currently debating amendments to this proposal with a vote on the overall measure expected this week.

This bill deserves the full support of higher education because it presents an extraordinary opportunity for our nation, including colleges and universities whose missions to promote education, research and economic growth will be advanced with immigration reform. Those of us in higher education must seize this moment to urge our senators to pass this bill.  While the situation seems ripe for agreement, we know far too well that even the smallest bumps in the road can cause this process to unravel. It’s critical to underscore that a well-stocked pool of talent at American universities will feed directly into American businesses and create new ones that will help power our nation’s economy forward. The more we collectively make the case for the economic benefits of reform, the better the chances for overwhelming passage.

The bipartisan bill moving steadily through the Senate is filled with an array of provisions that have been long overdue. The measure establishes an expedited pathway to citizenship for the children of undocumented immigrants. These young people are here through no decision of their own and 65,000 of them graduate from U.S. high schools each year. They should have a process in place to become citizens. And they also should have the opportunity to go to their states' public colleges and universities at in-state tuition rates at the state’s discretion while participating in federal student loan and work study programs. The Senate bill would make all of this possible.

The Gang of Eight and many others also recognize the economically self-defeating policy of training the best international STEM students at U.S. universities only to force them to leave for no reason other than a lack of employment visas. To fix this, the bill streamlines and expands the green card process and eliminates many of the current system’s worst features. To be fair, there are some further improvements the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) would still like to see made either through the amendment process now or in conjunction with action in the House, such as ensuring that agriculture, natural resource, and other science fields are included within the definition of STEM. Nevertheless, overall the provisions in the bill are a vast improvement from the current system.

And just as important as having the best and brightest students in our classrooms is having the top professors from around the world to teach them. APLU and our fellow higher education associations worked very hard to successfully secure an amendment to rid the bill of several bureaucratic hurdles that would impede some universities utilizing the H-1B visa process that authorizes such temporary work. As a result of advocacy efforts with federal relations officers of many universities, higher education associations, and the critical support of the Gang of Eight, the bill no longer places some universities within a suspect class of H-1B users considered H-1B skilled worker dependent employers.

Those opposed to immigration reform are aggressively working to derail any action. They are calling, e-mailing, tweeting, mailing, faxing, and doing everything they can to overwhelm House and Senate offices in order to block reform. To counter that, the higher education community must unite and let our lawmakers know that those other voices do not represent the majority of Americans.

The Senate bill includes most of the changes those of us in the higher education community have been seeking for the past several decades.  Now that we find them included in a comprehensive immigration bill making its way through Congress we cannot allow this chance to slip away. Doing so is important for higher education, but most of all it is important for our country.
 

Peter McPherson is president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.

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New presidents provosts: CSULA Dominguez Hills Luther Stanislaus SKCTC Stonehill UVM

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  • William A. Covino, provost and vice president for academic affairs of California State University, Fresno, has been selected as president of California State University at Los Angeles.
  • Rev. John Denning, vice president for student affairs at Stonehill College, in Massachusetts, has been named president there.

UT Austin students' reaction to ruling muted

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Supreme Court's decision produces a mixed but muted reaction among students at the University of Texas at Austin, with many expecting a more definitive ruling.

At lawyers' meeting, show of support for shared governance

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At a gathering of college lawyers, campus leaders generally agree that institutions shun faculty role in governance at their peril.

Berkeley's Difficulties Paying for Its Stadium

The University of California at Berkeley is struggling to pay the bills on its newly renovated $321 million football stadium, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. A major part of the plan was to sell premium seats, at $40,000 to $250,000 each for use for 40 to 50 years. The university's plan for paying off the debt on the stadium assumed that, by this month, the university would have sold 2,902 of the seats. In fact, the university has sold only 1,857 seats, and 16 purchasers have stopped payments and are giving up their seats.

UNC Avoids Accreditation Sanctions for 'No-Show' Classes

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges notified officials at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on Thursday that the university will not be put on probation or warned over academic irregularities in the university's Department of African and Afro-American Studies that came to light last year. Instead, the university will be monitored over the next year to ensure that it follows through on plans to "make whole" the degrees of individuals who took the classes where the irregularities occurred.

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Judge Rejects Suit Against Columbia Over Italian Center

A New York State judge has dismissed a lawsuit against Columbia University, finding that the plaintiffs did not have standing to sue over Columbia's management of a 1927 gift by Italian-American families, Bloomberg reported. The gift was used to create La Casa Italiana as a center for Italian scholarship and culture at the university. But the suit charged that the university permitted numerous programs at the center that weren't connected to the donors' intended mission. The suit was brought by the Italic Institute of America, and the judge ruled that the institute didn't have standing to sue, despite its shared interest with the donors in Italian culture.

 

Suit Accuses Carlow U. of Getting Rid of Older Women

Three former administrators at Carlow University have sued the institution, in federal court, charging the recent elimination of jobs has had an unfair impact on older workers, and in particular on older women, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The women who sued were 61, 65 and 73 at the time that their jobs ended. Their suit charges that 11 positions were eliminated, 6 of them held by women over the age of 60. The suit charges that the duties performed by the administrators were given to younger employees. A Carlow spokesman said that he had not seen the lawsuit and so could not comment on it.

New Effort to Promote Faculty Work-Family Balance

The American Council on Education on Wednesday launched a campaign asking college and university presidents to promote faculty career flexibility on their campuses.

"We've found time and time again that flexible workplace policies make for happier, more committed faculty, which ultimately translates to better outcomes for our institutions and our students," Molly Corbett Broad, ACE president, said in a news release announcing the National Challenge for Higher Education: Retaining a 21st Century Workforce.

The campaign aims to reduce faculty turnover, increase productivity and engagement among faculty, and to develop means for baby boomer faculty to remain involved in institutional life upon retirement (ACE noted this is particularly important given the “looming wave” of baby boomer retirements) through more flexible work models.

Ten presidents and chancellors already have signed on to the campaign as founding partners. They are:

  • John J. DeGioia, Georgetown University
  • Mildred García, California State University at Fullerton
  • Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, University of Maryland at Baltimore County
  • Linda P.B. Katehi, University of California at Davis
  • Renu Khator, University of Houston System chancellor and University of Houston president
  • William E. Kirwan, University System of Maryland
  • David Maxwell, Drake University
  • Lynn Pasquerella, Mount Holyoke College
  • Steven G. Poskanzer, Carleton College
  • Lou Anna K. Simon, Michigan State University
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