administrators

AGB launching commission to rethink role of governing boards, including in academics

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Trustee association is putting together a high-profile committee to rethink board structure and role in the face of challenges, including talk about what role trustees should play in academics.

Appeals Court Backs Release of Names of Officers in Pepper Spray Incident

A California appeals court has ruled that the names of the officers involved in the notorious pepper spray incident at the University of California at Davis are covered by the state's open records law and should be released, the Associated Press reported. The Los Angeles Times and The Sacramento Bee have been requesting the names. The appeals court issued a stay for the ruling, giving the union that represents the officers 40 days to file an appeal with the California Supreme Court.

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Cal State Sets 6 No-Raise Presidential Salaries

The board of the California State University System on Tuesday set the salaries of six campus presidents, and officials made a point of saying that none of the salaries represented an increase over what the presidents' predecessors had earned, The Los Angeles Times reported. In addition, the university said that there are no supplemental pay packages for any of the new presidents. The system has been criticized in the past by politicians, students and faculty leaders for significant raises for new presidents over what previous presidents had earned.

 

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Louisiana Tech Agrees to Improve Services for Blind

Louisiana Tech University has agreed to use online learning materials that are accessible to the blind, under an agreement to resolve complaints of discrimination investigated by the U.S. Department of Justice. The department found that the university had been using materials that caused a blind student to fall behind on his schoolwork. That student will receive more than $23,000 under the settlement.

 

Salle Mae survey finds families unwilling to pay more for higher education

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The annual amount families spent on college leveled off at about $21,000 after several years of decline, according to Sallie Mae survey, which finds families -- particularly high-income ones -- taking steps to limit their expenditures.

2 Months After No Confidence Vote, Gadsden State President on Leave

Two months after faculty and staff votes of no confidence in his leadership, Ray Staats has been placed on leave as president of Gadsden State Community College, in Alabama, WBRC News reported. Faculty said that his priorities were misplaced, charging him with creating administrative positions and spending on facilities that weren't needed at a time that programs important to students lacked for funds. Staats did not respond to a requeset for comment.

 

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Women's Basketball Coach Said to Focus on Weight, Christianity

The recent firing of Beckie Francis as women's basketball coach at Oakland University (along with the subsequent resignation of her husband, the university president) has been somewhat mysterious on the campus. But The Detroit Free Press reported on the results of interviews with former players that Francis pushed Christianity on players, told them that they needed to be virgins and was "fixated" on body issues. The players reported that photographs were taken of them in sports bras and Spandex to chart any changes in body size. Francis declined to comment for the article.

New presidents provosts Dordt JFK NDUS Reedley Wayne State Western Washington Winona

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  • Sandra Caldwell, associate vice president for planning and improvement at Western Wyoming Community College, has been chosen as president of Reedley College, part of the State Center Community College District, in California.

Historians Criticize Mitch Daniels

The American Historical Association on Friday released a statement criticizing the way Mitch Daniels (when he governor of Indiana, prior to becoming president of Purdue University) exchanged e-mail messages with staff members criticizing the work of the late Howard Zinn. "Whatever the strengths or weaknesses of Howard Zinn’s text, and whatever the criticisms that have been made of it, we believe that the open discussion of controversial books benefits students, historians, and the general public alike. Attempts to single out particular texts for suppression from a school or university curriculum have no place in a democratic society," said the statement.

Daniels defended himself last week in part by citing the work of historians far to his left who have also criticized Zinn. But some of those who Daniels cited (and who are no longer part of the statement posted on the Daniels website at Purdue) have since objected to his use of their statements about Zinn. Michael Kazin, a professor of history at Georgetown University whose criticism was cited by Daniels, published as statement on the Academe blog of the American Association of University Professors. "I don’t think much of Zinn’s interpretation of U.S. history, it’s true. But it’s an interpretation, which like any serious work of history, chooses to emphasize certain themes and details in order to make a larger argument. I would be unhappy if Zinn’s book were the only or even the main text in a high-school or college history class (as I understand is sometimes the case). But chapters of it can be quite useful if contrasted with alternative interpretations," Kazin wrote. "When Daniels accuses Zinn of being a 'biased writer,' he just shows how little he understands about how history is now and has always been written. Every historian has a point of view about whichever portion of the past they choose to study. If they didn’t, they wouldn’t be writing about it in the first place."

Sam Wineburg, a professor of education at Stanford University whose criticism of Zinn was also cited by Daniels, issued a series of comments on Twitter: "Mitch Daniels uses my work to defend his shameless attempts to censor free speech. Shame!" and "Mr. Daniels, free societies openly teach ideas we disagree with. We do not censor objectionable speech. Study your Orwell" and "I have criticized Zinn but will defend to my death the right to teach him. Shame on Mitch Daniels."

 

 

 

Whatever the strengths or weaknesses of Howard Zinn’s text, and whatever the criticisms that have been made of it, we believe that the open discussion of controversial books benefits students, historians, and the general public alike. Attempts to single out particular texts for suppression from a school or university curriculum have no place in a democratic society. - See more at: http://blog.historians.org/2013/07/aha-statement-on-academic-freedom-and-the-indiana-governor/#sthash.IgsBXLEs.dpuf
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Tensions at Brooklyn College

Faculty members at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York are angry that President Karen Gould has rejected the choices of professors to lead three departments, making her own selections instead, The Wall Street Journal reported. Gould maintains that she has the right to pick department chairs, but faculty members say that the norm is to respect professors' votes, particularly if departments are well-managed and certain choices have broad support.

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