administrators

Appeals Court Issues Stay to Delay Athlete Payments

The effects of last year's ruling in the lawsuit filed by Ed O'Bannon against the National Collegiate Athletic Association's over name and likeness payments were set to begin Saturday. In August, Judge Claudia Wilken ruled that the NCAA violated antitrust law by not allowing athletes to be paid for the use of their names and likeness. The ruling would have allowed, though not required, colleges to pay players about $5,000 each year beginning on August 1.

On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit granted the NCAA a last minute stay of that injunction, preserving the status quo while the association appeals the original ruling. The NCAA has argued that allowing athletes to be paid any amount of money outside of scholarship funds would cause "irreparable harm" to its amateurism model. The court did not say when it would release its opinion on the appeal. 

"We are pleased that the Ninth Circuit today granted the NCAA’s motion for stay," Donald Remy, NCAA chief legal officer, said in a statement. "As a result, the NCAA will not be implementing any changes to its rules in response to the district court’s injunction at this time. We continue to await the Ninth Circuit’s final ruling.”

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Privacy 'loophole' remains open after outrage over U of Oregon's handling of therapy records

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Months after U of Oregon's actions exposed the ability of colleges to seek mental health records of alleged rape victims, the outrage hasn't led to action to prevent others from doing the same thing.

Whittier Adjuncts Tout Gains in First Union Contract

Adjuncts at Whittier College gained some significant improvements to their working conditions in their first union contract, they announced late last week. They’ll see an increase in pay from $1,150 per credit hour to $1,550 by fall 2016, plus a $300 course cancellation fee within 21 days of the start of classes and pro-rated pay for any classes actually taught. A professional development fund also has been established. 
 
The Service Employees International Union-affiliated adjuncts also gained more job security, such as 1-year appointments starting with the second year of service (up from semester-to-semester appointments). The contract includes additional protections for reappointment and evaluation and a “just cause” standard for discipline and dismissal. 
 
Whittier adjuncts make up the third SEIU-related part-time faculty union to achieve a contract since SEIU began its Adjunct Action campaign, a major push to organize adjuncts across metro areas. Adjuncts at Tufts and Lesley universities saw similar gains in their first contracts. Dozens of other new unions are negotiating their first contracts.
 
Whittier President Sharon Herzberger said in an emailed statement that the college and SEIU "have been hard at work for about a year to reach a fair and mutually beneficial agreement. We look forward to continuing our constructive relationship with the union and our talented group of adjunct professors as we prepare to welcome our students in early September." (Note: This story has been updated from an earlier version to include Herzberger's comments.)
 
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UConn Reports Data Breach by Chinese Hackers

The University of Connecticut on Friday reported a "criminal cyberintrusion" of its engineering college, and that hackers from China appear responsible. The university said it did not have evidence of data removal. But the university said that it is adopting new security measures as well as informing individuals and sponsors of research that could have been accessed. After Pennsylvania State University reported similar attacks, apparently from China in the case of the university's engineering college, experts warned that other universities would likely see such hacking incidents.

 

Akron, Amid Cuts, Spent $950K on President's House

The University of Akron, receiving scrutiny for the layoffs of more than 200 people, spent $950,000 recently on renovations for the presidential home, Northeast Ohio Media Group reported. Critics don't contest that the house needed some repair work, but question some of the spending. For example, the project expanded the master bedroom and created a suite for the in-laws of President Scott Scarborough. The university notes that private donations paid for the project, but the university also assigned its own painters, carpenters and electricians to do hundreds of hours of work on the project.

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Kaplan, Lincoln Tech Settle with Mass. Attorney General

Kaplan Career Institute and Lincoln Technical Institute have settled with the Massachusetts attorney general, Maura Healey, to resolve allegations of inflating job placement numbers and employing unfair recruiting tactics, Healey's office said in a written statement. The settlement is part of Healey's broad pursuit of the for-profit industry. Kaplan agreed to pay about $1.4 million to resolve the suit. Lincoln paid about $1 million. Most of the money will go to help eligible former students who attended the two for-profit chains to pay down their debt.

In a written statement, Kaplan, Inc., said it "emphatically maintains that its actions were compliant and in the best interests of students, who were well-served by the institution." The settlement did not include a finding of wrongdoing, and Kaplan said it resolved the legal challenge "due to the high cost of protracted litigation."

White House Summit on Short-Term Training Programs

The White House is hosting a meeting today on the growing boot camp and coding academy space, which offers short-term training programs to students. Other alternative providers, such as online course platforms, also are on the agenda, said several invitees.

The meeting is expected to include a discussion of how these entities might partner with traditional colleges. The U.S. Department of Education is considering an experimental sites project to allow federal aid to flow to a limited group of boot camps and MOOC providers that partner with accredited colleges. The experiment would also include a new quality control process, perhaps managed by an existing or new accreditor.

Pairings between colleges and boot camps have already begun. For example, Galvanize, a technology-focused academy with six campuses, announced a partnership with the University of New Haven last October to offer an accredited master's degree in big data.

Coding academies and boot camps will graduate an estimated 16,000 students this year.

CSU San Marcos and Mt. San Jacinto College travel to team up on joint degree program

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Temecula didn't have a public university, so CSU San Marcos and Mt. San Jacinto College made the trip to create a joint degree track with some novel features.

New presidents or provosts: Aims Alberta Jacksonville Morrisville MSU-Billings Redlands Simpson West Indies Westminster Worthington-Scranton

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  • Benjamin Ola. Akande, professor of economics and dean of the George Herbert Walker School of Business and Technology at Webster University, in Missouri, has been chosen as president of Westminster College, also in Missouri.

Professor says her comments on social media have been unfairly characterized

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A professor is speaking out against a Fox News report about months-old tweets that she says prompted a flood of hate mail and unfairly characterized her positions.

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