administrators

Steven Salaita speaks out about lost job offer at Illinois

Smart Title: 

In his first public remarks since losing his job offer, controversial scholar says he still wants to teach at U. of Illinois.

Princeton Weighs Ideas to Help Low-Income Students

Princeton University may soon take several steps to create a campus that is more inclusive to lower-income students, including featuring socioeconomic diversity in freshman orientation and diversity programming, incorporating sensitivity to socioeconomic status in residential housing assignments, and forming a standing committee of administrators to consider polices that affect the educational and social experiences of low-income and first-generation students. The steps are part of a list of recommendations issued Tuesday by a working group appointed by former President Shirley Tilghman and chaired by Valerie Smith, Princeton's undergraduate dean.

While the group found that Princeton's admission and financial aid polices "enabled students from across the socioeconomic spectrum to participate fully in the academic and residential life of the university," it also identified academic challenges that have a "disparate impact on students from lower-income backgrounds." The report noted that students from those backgrounds also faced financial constraints that shut them out of some aspects of campus life, leading them to feel less accepted at the university. The group also recommended:

  • Considering alternative systems for measuring academic performance during freshman year, such as "covering" first-year grades by providing students with complete grades but only reporting on transcripts whether they passed or failed a course.
  • Centralizing systems for monitoring students' academic difficulties.
  • Highlighting the existence of courses that address issues concerning social and economic inequality.
  • Ensuring that panels during the university's Freshman Families Weekend feature socioeconomically diverse students and address concerns most pressing to less prosperous parents.

"Some of the recommendations are already being implemented, and Dean Smith and her colleagues are pursuing some of the others," Christopher Eisgruber, Princeton's president, stated. "Some of the recommendations would require additional consideration before we could decide whether to proceed with them, and in some cases we would need to raise the necessary funds."

Ad keywords: 

Court Backs Right of Oklahoma to Suspend Athlete

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has backed the right of the University of Oklahoma to impose a one-year suspension on a football player, Frank Shannon, who was accused of sexual assault, NewsOK reported. A lower court gave Shannon a stay of the suspension, but the Supreme Court said that there was no authority to do so, and that the university was within its rights.

 

Ad keywords: 

NCAA lifts Penn State's postseason ban two years early

Smart Title: 

The NCAA has reduced some of its sanctions against Penn State, allowing the university's football team to participate in postseason games two years earlier than originally decided.

Despite ban, paid fantasy sports leagues still popular among NCAA athletes

Section: 
Smart Title: 

Eight of 10 college athletes don't think participating in paid fantasy sports leagues is a violation of NCAA rules. They're wrong.

Trustee Sorry for Saying Faculty Who Write Anonymously 'Can Go to Hell'

Garth Lovvorn, a trustee of Alabama's Athens State University, has apologized for saying that faculty members who send anonymous letters of complaint "can go to hell," The Times Daily reported. Many faculty members -- with and without their names attached -- have been complaining about the way the university is run. In an email to the campus, Loworn apologized for his "outburst." He said that he was trying to say "that I wanted cohesiveness between the administration, the faculty and the board and together we can turn the morale problem around."

 

Ad keywords: 

Hazing Death Leads Northridge to Shut Down Fraternity

California State University at Northridge has shut down the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity after completing a report on a student's death during the summer, The Los Angeles Times reported. The student was on a long forced hike without adequate water, the report found. "Hazing is stupid, senseless, it is dangerous and it is against the law in California," said Dianne F. Harrison, said. "It is a vestige of toxic thinking in which somehow it is O.K. to degrade, to humiliate and potentially harm others.... It will not be tolerated."

Ad keywords: 

Advice on interviewing gay candidates for academic jobs

Karen M. Whitney and Jon Derek Croteau offer guideposts for interacting with candidates and finding the best talent for key academic positions.

Section: 
Topic: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Essay asks why there is not an ice bucket equivalent to support higher education

If your college or university is anything like mine – seeking significantly increased resources to enable all the research, student aid, and facilities development that we would like to support – then perhaps you’ve been watching this summer’s social media phenom of the ALS ice bucket challenge with a sense of envy.

I share in the general pleasure that a worthy charity has enormously increased its finances, which may speed up a cure for a terrible disease. On the tally board of life, this profuse bucketing outbreak goes on the plus side for those of us who’d like to believe that people are basically good and inclined to help others in need.

And I also see the cavils: that this movement is a “slacktivist” fad, an easy and lazy manifestation of commitment; that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is relatively rare, and perhaps less deserving of funding than more prevalent maladies like malaria, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s; and that research funding should be determined by the rational standards of peer review rather than clickbait.

But my own foremost (and self-centered) response to this orgy of charitable energy is: If only I’d thought of it first. We might have a half-dozen new endowed chairs in our department and teaching-free dissertation fellowships for every one of our graduate students. Zadie Smith and Thomas Pynchon would be the featured speakers in our English department lecture series. (Granted, Pynchon’s not very visible on the lecture circuit, but wait until he sees our offer!)

Is our cause sufficiently worthy? Of course it is, and it’s pointless to argue whether higher education or ALS is more deserving: apples and oranges. The suffering of an ALS victim is terrible. The plight of people who cannot maximize their talents, too, is terrible. At my university, where over half our students qualify for Pell Grants and a third are first-generation college students, I see firsthand every day how profoundly meaningful a college education is for those who are marginally able to achieve it, and how fundamentally valuable it would be to extend that margin as much as possible.

So what can we do to connect with the public, to promote our worthy cause, and to set off a chain reaction that will bring along hordes of people jumping onto our bandwagon?

In the meta-analysis of the ice bucket challenge, many have commented on the arbitrariness of charitable giving and of catching the public’s eyes and hearts. But still, is there something we in academe can learn from this? Is this sort of philanthropic enterprise replicable? 

Where can I sign up my department to raise millions of dollars? I suppose I’d include the humanities at large – or even more magnanimously, I’ll extend the invitation to academe generally. (Participants from every campus could sport their university T-shirts to identify the recipient of each donation.)

Nearly as important as the cash, it would be extremely rewarding to find ourselves in the thick of a snowballing social movement, like the ALS campaign, that raises national consciousness and unleashes a contagious enthusiasm about what we do in higher education and how deserving our mission is of support.

Probably the appeal of the ice bucket campaign was lucky and unpredictable; if anyone knew exactly what makes a multimillion-hit meme, I imagine there would be consultants charging multimillion-dollar fees to produce them. (Perhaps there actually are such consultants, though I’m not aware of them.) Is it the snazzy visuals of the unexpected? The counterintuitive willingness to ruin an outfit and suffer – however momentarily – what I imagine would be a very unpleasant experience? (I haven’t taken this challenge myself, though I strongly suspect that I will be invited to do so any minute now.)

Honestly, I don’t have any bright ideas about how exactly to stage an academic iteration: a pie in the face? Banana peel pratfalls? Blind man’s bluff into a vat of tomato sauce? 

Perhaps we in the academy should aspire to something more dignified, but maybe, presuming that the success of ALS merits attention as a “best practice” ripe for our own adaptation, what draws massive crowds of participants is precisely the unexpected contrast between the seriousness of the problem and the oddly undignified escapism of the momentary “challenge.”

Some kind of slapstick gesture seems necessary: something physical and messy and shocking, involving a very intimately personal – bodily – engagement.

As silly as it is, the ALS Association’s challenge represents a wonderful manifestation of human ambition and determination: curing a debilitating disease seems undoable until it’s doable. With enough resolve, and enough money to throw at the problem, and enough human intelligence (which mainly takes the form, I will note, of academic research), it can be done. 

The same goes for a university education. Our scholarship, our teaching, and our community partnerships all contribute to the creation of a better society as measured by myriad qualitative and quantitative metrics. The notion of millions of citizens taking the time and energy to help us out by doing something that affirms our value would vitally reinvigorate our campuses after years of retrenched government funding and skyrocketing student debt. If our campaign were as successful as the ice bucket challenge – and why not dare to dream big? – we could actually mitigate those twin financial catastrophes that have lately taken such a toll on higher education.

I’ve done the hard part here in announcing this challenge to launch our challenge. Now somebody please just send me the YouTube link when you’ve figured out the specifics.
 

Author's email: 
Wikimedia Commons

Randy Malamud is Regents’ Professor and chair of the English department at Georgia State University.

 

Illinois Chancellor Sees Errors in Process, Not Outcome

Phyllis Wise, chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is standing by her decision to block the hiring of Steven Salaita -- known for his anti-Israel tweets -- to teach in the American Indian studies program. But The News-Gazette reported that in a campus appearance Wednesday she noted "errors" in the process by which appointments are reviewed. For instance, she noted that candidates are offered jobs pending board approval, sometimes teaching before the board has assented. She also said she should have consulted with more people before making the decision.

 

Ad keywords: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - administrators
Back to Top