admissions

Colleges await Supreme Court review of affirmative action

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Critics and defenders of affirmative action analyze coming battle at Supreme Court. Key questions: How broad will ruling be? How will Justice Kennedy vote? How will heightened attention affect race relations on campus?

Supreme Court takes up affirmative action case

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U.S. Supreme Court agrees to consider whether U. of Texas can consider race and ethnicity in admissions decisions. (Updated with reactions.)

DePaul's community college partnership aims to streamline transferring

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DePaul's new community college partnership aims to eliminate the mysteries behind transferring.

Veterinary schools expand, with focus on large animals

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Professional schools that have been nearly impossible to get into are adding slots.

Federal probe raises new questions on discrimination against Asian American applicants

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Conventional wisdom says Asian-American applicants face higher hurdle than others at elite colleges. Federal probe raises question of whether differential standards can be proven and -- if so -- would violate the law.

Two-year colleges in California move toward rationing student access

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While California's community college system debates how to ration student access, two of its institutions have begun the sometimes-painful process.

'Pay-for-Play' in U.S. Admissions Travel to China?

The latest in a series of Reuters articles about international admissions fraud examines what one critic describes as a “pay-for-play” arrangement through which Chinese education companies gain direct access to U.S. admissions officers for their student clients. The article explores how two American consultants for three major Chinese education companies have recruited dozens of U.S. admissions officers to come to China to meet with the companies’ student clients, with most of the travel costs being picked up by the companies. Two of the companies -- New Oriental Education & Technology Group and Dipont Education Management Group -- have been accused by former or current employees of engaging in college application fraud, accusations both companies deny.

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College Board's New Process for Accommodations

The College Board on Thursday announced a new process for people with disabilities to request test accommodations. Under the new system, most students who have been approved for test accommodations in high school will receive accommodations as long as their high school can answer two questions in the affirmative: “Is the requested accommodation(s) in the student’s plan?” and “Has the student used the accommodation(s) for school testing?”

Many advocates for students with disabilities have complained in the past that such students should not have to go through an entire process when they have already done so in high school (and in many cases before that). The changes announced are among those such advocates have sought.

The new policy applies to a number of College Board tests, including the SAT and Advanced Placement exams.

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Austin College Goes Test Optional in Admission

Austin College has announced that it is dropping its requirement that applicants submit SAT or ACT scores. The college will now accept, instead of test scores, an expository paper written for a high school course, with teacher comments and a final grade on the paper.

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Law School Gender Gaps

A new report documents unequal patterns involving gender in law school enrollments -- patterns that relate to employment prospects after law school. Among the findings:

  • While women earn more than 57 percent of undergraduate degrees, they make up only 51 percent of law school applicants.
  • About 3.4 percent of male college graduates apply to law school, while only 2.6 percent of women do so.
  • Male applicants to law school are more likely to be admitted than are female applicants, with admit rates of 79.5 percent for men and 75.8 percent for women. (While men, on average, have higher scores on the Law School Admission Test, women have better college grades.)
  • Law schools with the highest job placement rates tend to enroll smaller percentages of women than do law schools with poor job placement rates.

The report was prepared by Deborah Jones Merritt, a professor of law at Ohio State University, and Kyle McEntee, executive director of the group Law School Transparency, which has pushed law schools to reveal more information about job placement to prospective applicants. The full report may be found here.

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