admissions

Goucher reports that students admitted via video did better academically than other students

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Goucher says students admitted on the basis of a short film did better academically than those who applied in traditional ways. But is sample large enough to be meaningful?

Princeton University will resume transfer admissions for first time since 1990

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Experts see move as one sign of increased interest by highly competitive colleges in transfers.

NYU questions Common Application on value of asking applicants about criminal records

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NYU asks Common Application if it can demonstrate the value of asking applicants about their criminal or disciplinary records. If there is no proof, does that change the debate?

Mills Goes Test Optional in Admissions

Mills College announced last week that it will no longer require the SAT or ACT for admissions. College officials cited research showing that many minority and low-income students want the option to be judged on measures other than test scores.

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Siena Heights U Goes Test Optional on Admissions

Siena Heights University, in Michigan, announced last week that it will no longer require applicants to submit SAT or ACT scores. “The test-optional policy should strengthen and diversify an already outstanding applicant pool and will broaden access for those high-achieving students who have historically been underrepresented at selective colleges and universities, including students of color, first-generation students and students from low-income households,” said a statement from George Wolf, vice president of enrollment management.

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The SAT, the Blizzard and Security Concerns

Many students who planned to take the SAT Saturday are being forced to change plans. A blizzard hitting the East Coast has already led numerous test centers to shut down and call off testing planned for Saturday. This webpage notes the rescheduling of the SAT at those testing centers.

The College Board also announced Thursday it was calling off Saturday administrations of the SAT at some Asian test centers. "This decision is based on evidence that some students have been exposed to test materials intended for this administration. We have done our best to limit the number of centers canceled and the impact to students," said an email the College Board sent to admissions officials.

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A New Call for Reform of Admissions

It's time for competitive college admissions to undergo significant changes, according to a report, “Turning the Tide,” issued Wednesday by the Making Caring Common program at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. The reforms called for include: going test optional on admissions or assuring students that standardized tests aren't the crucial part of applications, discouraging students from trying to take the maximum number of Advanced Placement courses possible and encouraging high school students to focus on the quality rather than quantity of extracurricular activities. Generally, admissions experts and many admissions administrators have long called for many of these reforms, as have some past reports and books.

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Report on Graduate School Admissions

A new report by the Council of Graduate Schools finds that admissions leaders in graduate programs view "holistic" review -- in which applicants are evaluated individually, without a simple grid to determine decisions -- as effective generally and as a tool to increase diversity of student bodies. But the report notes that time constraints limit the use of holistic review. Further, the report notes that many admissions leaders want more information on how to link admissions criteria and student success.

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Admissions Officers Check Applicants on Social Media

About 40 percent of admissions officers say they research applicants on social media, according to a survey released Wednesday by Kaplan Test Prep. That's quadruple the percentage from a 2008 Kaplan survey. At the same time, the survey found that most admissions officers who do check social media don't use it often -- of those who use social media to check on applicants, 89 percent said they did so "rarely." Some of the reasons people check are potentially positive, such as investigating applicants' abilities and interests. But Kaplan officials have heard anecdotal reports of "admissions sabotage" in which some people send tips to admissions officers that other applicants have images on Facebook or elsewhere that might give an admissions panel doubt about offering a spot.

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NCAA punishes Louisiana-Lafayette over test fraud, and university sues ACT

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NCAA punishes U of Louisiana-Lafayette over egregious case of test fraud -- and the university in turn sues ACT over its role.

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