Texas State Accidentally Sends Acceptance Letters to 450

Texas State University is the latest institution to accidentally mail acceptance materials to those whom the institution was not actually accepting. The Austin American-Statesman reported that 450 people whose applications were not completed received welcoming materials about orientation and housing.


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Texas Bill Would Kill In-State Tuition for Undocumented Students

In 2001, Texas became the first state to pass a law granting in-state tuition rates to undocumented students. This week, lawmakers are considering a bill to repeal the law, The Houston Chronicle reported. While the fate of the effort is unclear, it has strong backing from the state's Tea Party movement. According to Michael Olivas, a University of Houston law professor who tracks state policy about undocumented students, there are currently 20 states that either by statute or board policy allow these students to pay in-state rates. To date, only Wisconsin has both adopted and repealed such a policy.


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Free Community College Program in Philadelphia

The Community College of Philadelphia is starting a free community college program, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Tuition will be waived for students who are graduates of the city's high schools and are eligible for Pell Grants. Students, once enrolled, will be required to earn degrees within three years and to maintain a 2.5 grade point average.


Trial Details Alleged Admissions Swindle

A Massachusetts trial is providing details about allegations that Mark Zimny, a consultant, convinced a wealthy Hong Kong businessman to pay him more than $2 million to get the businessman's sons into Ivy League colleges, The Boston Globe reported. Zimny is facing wire fraud, bank fraud and other charges -- all of which he has denied. In the first stage of the trial, the Hong Kong businessman, Gerald Chow, has testified about how Zimny instructed him to send money that would be donated to prep schools that would then admit his sons, paving their way to the Ivy League. The relationship soured when Chow discovered the prep schools never received his donations. Zimny's lawyers said that the payments were to look after Chow's sons.



To save itself, some believe a Virginia law school may move, but it risks hurting the town if it does

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Alumni worry the Appalachian School of Law must leave its home in a rural Virginia town to save itself -- and say one board member is intent on stopping the move.

Northeastern U. unveils Silicon Valley branch campus

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Northeastern U. unveils it latest branch campus -- a network of hubs hosted by companies in Silicon Valley. Future expansions may see the university going abroad.

Report on Challenges for High School Counselors in College Advising

High school counselors have significant time demands that keep them from spending as much time as many would like on college advising, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. Most counselors in the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 reported that their departments spent less than 20 percent of their time on college readiness, selection and applications. In addition, the study found that fewer than two-fifths of counselors indicated that their school had a counselor whose main responsibility was college applications or college selection.

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Kalamazoo Drops Admissions Test Requirement

Kalamazoo College is dropping its requirement that applicants submit S.A.T. or A.C.T. scores. The college announced that a faculty committee studied the impact and effectiveness of various admissions requirements. The study at the college found that high school grades were the most accurate predictor of academic performance at Kalamazoo, and that S.A.T. and A.C.T. scores reflected not academic performance, but family economic status.


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California community college system signs transfer deal with nine HBCUs

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California's community college system signs an agreement with nine historically black colleges to make it easier for students to transfer across state borders.

Top Japanese Universities Make Major Admissions Shift

The University of Tokyo and Kyoto University -- two top institutions in Japan -- are making a major shift in admissions policies, The Yomiuri Shimbun reported. Traditionally admissions have been based solely on entrance exam scores and essays designed to test intelligence. But now each high school will be permitted to recommend one male and one female student, based on qualities that might not be apparent in the traditional system.



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