admissions

When 10% of Frosh at a Flagship Are From China

Many American colleges and universities are recruiting more undergraduates from China. An article and video in The Chicago Tribune explore the issues related to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recruiting about 600 freshmen (around 10 percent of the class) from China. As recently as 2006, Illinois was enrolling only about 20 new undergraduates from China. This year, Illinois held three orientation sessions for Chinese students while they were still in China.

 

Spain seeks to attract more foreign students

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Spain, in bid for more foreign students, eliminates entrance exam.

Tired of All the Reports on Whether College Is Worth It?

Are you tired of all the reports about whether college is worth attending? The humor site The Onion apparently is tired of them, and so has responded with the satire for which the site is known. The headline: "Study Finds College Still More Worthwhile Than Spending 4 Years Chained To Radiator." The faux report is quoted as saying, “Compared to the intellectual stimulation and personal growth achieved in a university setting, there is less to be gained from 48 months in which one is tightly shackled about the ankle and connected by a short length of chain to a leaking, immovable cast-iron radiator."

 

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Bar Exam Technology Disaster

New law graduates in many states experienced a technology snafu at the worst possible time Tuesday night: as they were attempting to upload bar examinations just before deadlines in their states. Many reported spending hours trying and failing to upload their answers. ExamSoft, a company that manages the bar test submission process in many states, acknowledged "slowness or difficulty" being experienced by many test-takers, and said that it was sorry for the difficulties many were having. The company, working with various state bar associations, announced 17 deadline extensions by states, so that people who couldn't submit their exams would not be penalized.

The legal blog Above the Law posted some of the emails and social media messages being posted by angry law graduates. the blog said that the situation "appears to be the biggest bar exam debacle in history."

Many bar exams continue today, so the frustrated test-takers who were up late, some fearing that they may have failed by not submitting their day's results, have another stressful day ahead of them, for many of them without as much sleep as they might have had otherwise. One comment on the ExamSoft page on Facebook said: "This is unbelievably disrespectful. I don't think you quite understand the pressure we are all under. We understand technical issues happen (although you are supposed to be a tech company), but your 'support staff' is a joke and you should at the VERY least had updates for each of the states BEFORE their respective deadlines. Now we are wondering, HOURS before a second day of grueling testing if any of it will matter. Please answer the states with past or remaining deadlines. Or get someone to answer the phone, chat or email--> have been trying all three methods for 4 hours. Thanks."

One law blogger, Josh Blackman, wondered what would happen if failure rates are higher this year. He explained: "And for crying out loud, this is serious business. Failing the bar in this economy is a 6-month sentence of unemployment. Somewhere, a plaintiff’s lawyer is putting together a class-action suit for those who used ExamSoft and failed."

 

New study notes diversity issues in admissions employment

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Survey finds that women and minority professionals don't rise through the ranks in college admissions offices.

Temple, Montclair State No Longer Require SAT or ACT

Temple University and Montclair State University announced Tuesday that they will no longer require undergraduate applicants to submit SAT or ACT scores. Both institutions cited evidence that they can make admissions decisions based on grades in college preparatory courses, and both cited studies indicating that there are students who can succeed at their institutions but who may be hesitant to apply because they don't "test well." The announcements are notable because they come from large public universities. Many of the leaders of the test-optional movement have been small, private colleges.

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Athlete Twice Accused of Sexual Assault Will Play Again

A college basketball player accused of sexual assault at two colleges has found a third team to play for, enrolling on scholarship at Northwest Florida State College.

Brandon Austin was one of three University of Oregon basketball players who were suspended for up to 10 years last month after allegedly sexually assaulting a female classmate. He had been previously suspended from the Providence College basketball team for an alleged sexual assault there. Austin denies the charges and local law enforcement said it didn't have enough to charge him or any of the other men in either assault.

Earlier this month, Austin had attempted to transfer to Hutchinson Community College in Kansas, but he was denied admission. The way colleges handle sexual assaults involving athletes recently came under sharp scrutiny when a report released by U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill stated that more than 20 percent of institutions allow their athletics departments to oversee sexual assault cases.

"The college has decided to give this young man an opportunity to continue his education," Steve DeMeo, Northwest Florida State's head basketball coach, said in a statement. "We have the experience, support and resources to help Brandon get back on track towards graduating and help him be a successful student athlete on and off the court."

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Judge orders medical college to accommodate deaf student

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Three court rulings in the last year have given students with disabilities victories -- and rejected the idea that being deaf or blind makes it impossible to pursue a career in health professions.

Study Group Partnership off to Slow Start in Maine

The University of Maine’s partnership with the for-profit pathway program provider and international student recruiting company Study Group resulted in fewer students than hoped for in its first year, the Bangor Daily News reported. The target was to recruit 50 international students to the University of Maine and 20 to the University of Southern Maine in the first year. In fact, just four students enrolled at UMaine in fall 2013, one of whom withdrew; an additional 12 students enrolled later in the academic year and the university expects to enroll 20 new students this coming fall. The University of Southern Maine has enrolled one student through the partnership. 

Maine officials told the newspaper that by the time they signed the contract with Study Group – in March of 2013 – they’d missed that year’s recruitment cycle.

As Inside Higher Ed has reported, an increasing number of colleges have turned to corporate pathway providers like Study Group in hopes of increasing their international student populations.

More Out-of-State Students at U. of California

Enrollment of out-of-state students continues to rise, and provoke debate, at University of California campuses. The Los Angeles Times reported that the percentage of new freshmen from outside California will hit 20.2 percent in the fall, up from 18.3 percent last year and 15.5 percent the year before. While some public universities have for years admitted substantial percentages of their students from outside their states, the trend is relatively new for California, where officials say it is necessary because of the tuition revenue the students bring. The highest share of out-of-state students in the fall will be at UCLA (30.1 percent), followed by Berkeley (29.8 percent) and San Diego (28.4 percent). Merced is the lowest at 1.2 percent.

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