admissions

220 Colleges Have Space for More Students in Fall

The National Association for College Admission Counseling has released its annual list of colleges that are still accepting applications for admission this fall -- and there are more than 220 colleges on the list. While this total is lower than in some previous years, NACAC cautions that the list is simply a service it offers to members, only some of which participate in any given year, so the ups and downs on the list should not be viewed as trend indicators. The list may be found here.

 

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Smith College will accept transgender applicants who identify as women

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Smith College will now accept transgender applicants who identify as women. Will other women's colleges follow?

College of DuPage President, Under Fire, Takes Leave

Robert Breuder, president of the College of DuPage, started a medical leave today, days before the college's board was expected to put him on administrative leave, The Chicago Tribune reported. Breuder has been the subject of intense scrutiny by many over accusations of inappropriate spending, and faculty leaders have been calling for his ouster.

 

Drexel Congratulates 495 Applicants It Rejected

Drexel University accidentally sent 495 applicants it had rejected a congratulatory email meant for those it accepted, the Associated Press reported. The emails were intended to remind admitted applicants of the deadlines for accepting the offer. The emails arrived a few weeks after the rejected applicants were turned down, but some assumed that the university had let them in, after all. The university is apologizing for the mistake.

 

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Top LSAT Scorers Are Rarer in Law Schools

An Inside Higher Ed article in January looked at how some law schools are admitting applicants with much lower Law School Admission Test scores than would have been admitted in the past. A new article from Bloomberg looks at the top of the LSAT range. It finds that as of March 2015, the number of law school applicants who have scores of 165 or higher (on a 120 to 180 scale) is about half of what it was in 2010.

 

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Texas State Accidentally Sends Acceptance Letters to 450

Texas State University is the latest institution to accidentally mail acceptance materials to those whom the institution was not actually accepting. The Austin American-Statesman reported that 450 people whose applications were not completed received welcoming materials about orientation and housing.

 

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Texas Bill Would Kill In-State Tuition for Undocumented Students

In 2001, Texas became the first state to pass a law granting in-state tuition rates to undocumented students. This week, lawmakers are considering a bill to repeal the law, The Houston Chronicle reported. While the fate of the effort is unclear, it has strong backing from the state's Tea Party movement. According to Michael Olivas, a University of Houston law professor who tracks state policy about undocumented students, there are currently 20 states that either by statute or board policy allow these students to pay in-state rates. To date, only Wisconsin has both adopted and repealed such a policy.

 

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Free Community College Program in Philadelphia

The Community College of Philadelphia is starting a free community college program, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Tuition will be waived for students who are graduates of the city's high schools and are eligible for Pell Grants. Students, once enrolled, will be required to earn degrees within three years and to maintain a 2.5 grade point average.

 

Trial Details Alleged Admissions Swindle

A Massachusetts trial is providing details about allegations that Mark Zimny, a consultant, convinced a wealthy Hong Kong businessman to pay him more than $2 million to get the businessman's sons into Ivy League colleges, The Boston Globe reported. Zimny is facing wire fraud, bank fraud and other charges -- all of which he has denied. In the first stage of the trial, the Hong Kong businessman, Gerald Chow, has testified about how Zimny instructed him to send money that would be donated to prep schools that would then admit his sons, paving their way to the Ivy League. The relationship soured when Chow discovered the prep schools never received his donations. Zimny's lawyers said that the payments were to look after Chow's sons.

 

 

To save itself, some believe a Virginia law school may move, but it risks hurting the town if it does

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Alumni worry the Appalachian School of Law must leave its home in a rural Virginia town to save itself -- and say one board member is intent on stopping the move.

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