admissions

NACAC expected to embrace new approach to admissions ethics

Association delegates are expected to approve plan to focus on core principles as opposed to best practices.

Revoked admissions offer at Rochester raises questions about homeschooling transcripts

Revoked admissions offer by University of Rochester raises questions about lack of oversight of transcripts from homeschooled students. Experts see the real risk is lack of information about curriculum, not fraud.

Essay of advice for counselors on writing recommendations for students

Kat Coy offers advice on how to gather the information to write the letters.

List of job changes in admissions and enrollment management

New appointments announced at Bucknell, Cleveland Institute of Music, Daemen, TCS Education System, U of West Florida.

ACT scores are up, but gaps remain by preparation and race/ethnicity

But gaps remain, based on levels of preparedness and by race and ethnicity.

Antioch College New Student Enrollment at 22

Antioch College is only about a third of the way to its new student enrollment goal, putting the small college in western Ohio in danger of missing targets with less than a month to go before its fall quarter starts.

The college had 22 new students signed up for the fall quarter, Mark Reynolds, director of marketing and communications, confirmed Friday. It had been hoping for 60.

If classes started today, overall enrollment would be about 150 students. Last year the college enrolled 220 after bringing in 45 new students against a goal of more than 80.

But the college practices rolling admissions, Reynolds said. It will continue to enroll new students until the fall quarter starts in October.

Antioch has struggled with enrollment and fund-raising of late. In December, the college announced cuts to close budget shortfalls. It reported the elimination of five positions and cuts to 23 senior administrators’ salaries. The president and four senior administrators were taking 20 percent cuts, and 18 other senior-level staff members were in line for 5 percent pay cuts.

Antioch University closed the liberal arts Antioch College campus in Yellow Springs, Ohio -- long known as a home for progressive thinkers -- in 2008 amid enrollment and funding challenges. A group led by alumni purchased the campus and rights to its endowment in September 2009. The college reopened with a class of 35 students in the fall of 2011 and offered full-tuition scholarships for several years afterward.

The process of transitioning from a free model to one where students are charged is still under way, Reynolds said. It will take some time for perceptions to adjust, he said.

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Deep Springs Board Votes to Admit Women

The board of Deep Springs College voted Thursday to admit women to the all-male college, starting with the class that will enter the college in the fall of 2018. The board took a similar vote in 2011, but in the years since it has been fighting off litigation from some alumni opposed to coeducation. In June, when the California Supreme Court rejected the latest appeal, the road to coeducation was cleared. Students and faculty members have been pushing the college for years to admit women.

Deep Springs, in the high desert of California, offers two years of instruction, with full scholarships, and has an enrollment of 26. Many of its graduates go on to some of the most competitive colleges in the country. The students govern many functions of the college, including its working ranch.

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Admissions Insider: The Freshman Who Lied Her Way In

A private school noticed one of its students -- who never asked for materials to be sent to Rochester -- posted on social media that she was enrolling there. And then her scheme fell apart. The story may be found here.

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Sweet Briar Reports 95 New Students

Sweet Briar College enrolled just under 100 new students this fall in its second admissions cycle since alumnae blocked an attempt by the small private women’s college’s former board to close it.

This year’s new class totals 95 new students -- 81 first-year students and 14 transfers. On-campus enrollment stands at approximately 300 this fall.

Enrollments are significantly below those of last year, when Sweet Briar reported 134 degree-seeking first-time freshmen and 22 other first-year degree-seeking students on its Common Data Set. Sweet Briar reported a total of 350 full-time undergraduate students last year and 376 students counting part-time and graduate students.

Sweet Briar’s former board announced plans in March of 2015 to close the college at the end of that academic year, citing an unfavorable admissions climate and enrollment trends. College leaders moved to close while the institution still had substantial resources to pay for winding down operations. But alumnae fought the move in court, eventually winning a deal to keep the college open under a new president and remade board.

In 2014-15, the last year before Sweet Briar was nearly closed, it enrolled 641 full-time undergraduates. Its enrollment totaled 700 when graduate and part-time students were counted.

President Meredith Woo shared this year’s enrollment total Monday in a letter marking the start of the new academic year and summarizing recent Board of Directors meetings. Woo also detailed plans to grow and revamp the college’s academic offerings.

Sweet Briar plans to put a new core curriculum in place in the fall of 2018, a set of a dozen courses organized around the theme of leadership. Faculty members are also developing three centers of excellence around human and environmental sustainability, science and technology, and collaboration with the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

Woo also wrote of some three-week courses and giving students the chance to attend year-round in order to earn a degree in three years. A student could then earn a master’s degree in her fourth-year.

The college has relied heavily on fund-raising for the last two years. Fund-raising for 2016-17 included $14 million in gifts and grants and $6.8 million in future pledges. Sweet Briar’s endowment was valued at $73.9 million as of the end of June. When the former board decided to close the college, its endowment stood at approximately $85 million.

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U of Rochester revokes admissions offer to student who lied her way in

A private school noticed one of its students -- who never asked for materials to be sent to Rochester -- posted on social media that she was enrolling there. And then her scheme fell apart.

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