admissions

Goucher and Bennington both report success with highly nontraditional admissions options

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In first year Goucher applicants may by judged on a short video and Bennington applicants by an application portfolio they design, both colleges report early signs of success.

Cabrini, Pine Manor Drop SAT/ACT Requirements

Cabrini College and Pine Manor College have become the latest institutions to drop requirements that all applicants submit SAT or ACT scores.

 

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New study links certain application essays and college success

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Does language use and topic selection predict academic success in college? A new study suggests it does. (Hint to high schoolers: Move beyond personal experiences.)

Israeli Universities Oppose Government Admissions Plan

Israel's universities are objecting to a government plan to require that one in three students be admitted based only on their high school grades, and not on national admissions tests, Haaretz reported. University officials say that the tests are crucial, particularly in evaluating applicants in the sciences. One official told Haaretz: “If everyone wants to study the humanities that might be true, but in those departments there was never a problem getting accepted.”

Three years after launch, 'U.S. News' rankings of online programs still draw mixed response

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U.S. News & World Report continues to tweak its ranking of online programs, but critics say the publication's claims about their importance go too far.

Western Governors' deepening partnership with StraighterLine creates a new path to completion

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Western Governors University steers rejected applicants to StraighterLine, an online course provider that acts as a low-risk way for students to prepare to earn a degree.

Intervening with high performing, low-income students changes enrollment patterns, study finds

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Intervening with low-income, high-ability high schoolers can change college choices in favor of more competitive institutions, study finds. But their images of liberal arts colleges and flagship universities may still deter enrollments.

Thomas College Goes Test-Optional in Admissions

Thomas College, in Maine, announced last month that it is dropping its requirement that undergraduates submit SAT or ACT scores. A statement from Thomas said: "The college will continue to accept scores from applicants that choose to submit their test results, but the college feels that standardized test scores are not as accurate as an applicant’s high school career in predicting success in college for most students."

 

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Hopkins Incorrectly Sends Acceptance Email to Nearly 300

Nearly 300 early-decision applicants to Johns Hopkins University who were rejected or deferred incorrectly received acceptance emails from the institution, The Washington Post reported. The university notified the students of the mistake and apologized for the error.

 

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Education Dept. Finds No Violation in Florida Scholarships

The Education Department's Office for Civil Rights has closed an investigation of a Florida scholarship program, finding no civil rights violations, The Miami Herald reported. The investigation was based on complaints that the use of SAT and ACT scores for parts of the scholarship program had a negative impact on black and Latino students' ability to win the full scholarships. The Education Department found that the use of test scores does diminish the chances of black and Latino students, but this is not illegal, according to the department.

Bob Schaeffer, public education director of FairTest: National Center for Fair & Open Testing, which filed the complaint against the Florida scholarships, issued this statement: "It is not surprising that the U.S. Department of Education, a national leader in promoting misuse and overuse of standardized exam results to assess students, teachers and schools, would decline to take action against Florida’s test-score based scholarships despite its own finding of the program’s 'statistically significant' negative impact on African Americans and Hispanics. We are pleased, however, that USDOE recognized that some students who score low on the SAT and ACT will do well in college."

 

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